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Tuesday, November 30, 2021

Weekly Post: THE TONGASS: Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees (#100-200) by Robert Glenn Ketchum

THE TONGASS:  Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees
by Robert Glenn Ketchum


In 1985, I began a 2-year commission to explore the Tongass rainforest, the largest forest in the United States Forest Service (USFS) system AND the largest temperate rainforest in the world. It was a unique, old-growth environment under siege from industrial logging. The resulting investigative book I published helped to pass the Tongass Timber Reform Bill, protect 1,000,000 acres of old-growth, and create 11 new wilderness areas. This is the story of how that was achieved.
~Robert Glenn Ketchum




Tuesday, June 23, 2020

THE TONGASS:  Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees, #200, 
Tongass, #200:  Krys and Jan Cianciarulo, my assistants for the first part of my second summer working on the Tongass rainforest commission, meet me in Ketchikan for a one-night gear check, and the next morning we fly out for Goat Lake in Misty Fjords National Monument. Last summer when I first saw Goat Lake on a flightsee, I was being flown by a pilot that suffered a tragic accident picking up hunters at the US Forest Service cabin on the lake. Although the lake is large with ample room to land, taking off can be trickier, as you need more running room to get airborne. That pilot was taking off after picking up the hunters from the cabin, so the plane was loaded down, and although he finally got airborne, he was very near the end of the lake (seen in this picture). Although he cleared the trees, he was quite low, and when he reached the edge of the fjord wall, he was down-drafted, crashing the plane and killing everyone but himself. On this day, I bring that tale up with our pilot, and he knows the entire incident. He adds that it was a weather related accident as well, because taking off in this direction seldom happens, given the direction the winds normally blow. When we reach the air above the fjord, there is no turbulence, he dips one wing, circles around, and gracefully drops in, to land on the lake. We are soon to be in our new “home” for the next three days, and we are all excited.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2020, @RobertGKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism Online:
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Thursday, October 14, 2021

Weekly Post, SUNDANCE: Artist-In-Residence by Robert Glenn Ketchum (#101+)

SUNDANCE:  Artist In Residence
by Robert Glenn Ketchum



From 1987-1989, Robert Redford invited me to become the first visual Artist-In-Residence at his newly established Sundance Institute, part of the community he was building around his recently purchased ski resort in Utah. The residency provided me with subject matter that produced some of the most significant images of my career, but importantly, it also afforded me my first aerial work, a platform that would become increasingly important throughout my life. A limited amount of these images were ever published, and NONE of the aerials ever were. The best will now appear, please enjoy!  ~Robert Glenn Ketchum




Thursday, October 14, 2021

SUNDANCE: Artist In Residence, #170
Sundance #170:  
Sundance is an amazing resort, a dramatic environment, and a brilliant idea. I am grateful to have been able to participate, and contribute as a visual artist, in the Artist-In-Residence program. I would like to thank all the staff that made me welcome, especially, Brent Beck, who went out of his way to provide me with access, and promote the work I created; the members of the ski patrol that periodically guided me; the gracious staff of the dining room that fed me every night; and last, but certainly not least, my friend, Robert Redford, who took an interest in my work, and gave me this incredible opportunity. Thank you all SO much!

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2021,
@RbtGlennKetchum @RobertGKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism Online:
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Wednesday, May 5, 2021

Weekly Post, ARCTIC: At the Cutting Edge of Climate Change (#101+)

ARCTIC:  At the Cutting Edge of Climate Change
by Robert Glenn Ketchum



In 1993, I began traveling to the Arctic. I have been across The Northwest Passage by yacht; to the North Pole twice; to little-visited Russian islands; and aboard research vessels in Greenland, Labrador, Newfoundland, and Baffin Island, taking the opportunity to visit Iqualuit, the capital of Nunavut, the recently created Inuit nation and territories.
~Robert Glenn Ketchum




Wednesday, May 5, 2021

ARCTIC:  At the Cutting Edge of Climate Change, #247
ARCTIC, #247:  
This is the last post for this Northwest Passage blog. Appropriately, it is a map of our journey, compiled for us by Captain Jouning. As you will recall, our adventure began in Nome, AK, to the far left. Trying to avoid the pack ice, we hugged the coastline of the Alaskan North Slope and Canada, as we progressed. This blog recounts the many places, and villages, at which we stopped along the way. If you look carefully, you will see that shortly after our trip turns North, there are red dots. That marks the spot where “Itasca” became trapped in the ice of the James Ross Strait for several days. Once we freed ourselves, and turned East, we reached the coast of Baffin Island and dropped anchor at the town of Pond Inlet. It was here that Bill Simon commandeered a cargo plane and two pilots. who allowed us to join them for some flightseeing. Our plane visited some historic, locations, the town of Resolute, and then flew North to Eureka Base, where we spent the night. The next day we visited Otto Fjord, returned to Eureka to fuel up, and then headed back to Pond Inlet with an attempted stop at Grise Fjord that nearly killed all of us. It was a great privilege for me as a photographer to get to view this vast Arctic landscape, so I thank my shipmates for having me along, and I hope all of you think my photographs have done justice to a part of the world you might never see.

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2021,
@RbtGlennKetchum @RobertGKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism Online:
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