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Thursday, October 29, 2020

Weekly Post, SUNDANCE: Artist-In-Residence by Robert Glenn Ketchum (#101+)

SUNDANCE:  Artist In Residence
by Robert Glenn Ketchum



From 1987-1989, Robert Redford invited me to become the first visual Artist-In-Residence at his newly established Sundance Institute, part of the community he was building around his recently purchased ski resort in Utah. The residency provided me with subject matter that produced some of the most significant images of my career, but importantly, it also afforded me my first aerial work, a platform that would become increasingly important throughout my life. A limited amount of these images were ever published, and NONE of the aerials ever were. The best will now appear, please enjoy!  ~Robert Glenn Ketchum




Thursday, October 29, 2020

SUNDANCE: Artist In Residence, #120
Sundance #120:  
In my studio, this is my version of rim lighting.

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2020, @RobertGKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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Wednesday, October 28, 2020

Weekly Post, THE SONORAN DESERT: Visiting with Don Juan by Robert Glenn Ketchum

THE SONORAN DESERT:  
Visiting with Don Juan
by Robert Glenn Ketchum



In 1988, I was contacted by Luther Propst, Director of the Rincon Institute of Tucson, AZ, who asked me if I could help them devise a campaign to protect a part of Saguaro National Monument from a massive real estate development that would disrupt substantial habitat.  I did so, and we not only succeeded in mitigating the development, we added 30,000 acres to the monument, and got it upgraded to National Park status.  While doing this work, I fell in love with the Sonoran Desert, returning to it repeatedly, and visiting the many varied parts of it in Arizona, Mexico, and Baja, CA.  This is the tale of those visits. 
~Robert Glenn Ketchum




Wednesday, October 28, 2020

THE SONORAN DESERT:  Visiting with Don Juan #28
Sonora #28:  
The descending slopes I am now traversing host fewer meadows of blooming flowers, and less small cacti, but they are flush with larger bushes and saguaros. Near the bottom of the slope, an expansive plain reaches out to the highway, and it is a virtual saguaro forest. There are hundreds of them that stretch all the way to the horizon, and the late light has set everything aglow with color and rim lighting. It is a spectacle made even more enjoyable because the evening brings with it a cool breeze. A lovely ending to a long, but fruitful, day. Now it is time for some black beans, and a big burrito.

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2020, @RobertGKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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Weekly Post, ARCTIC: At the Cutting Edge of Climate Change (#101+)

ARCTIC:  At the Cutting Edge of Climate Change
by Robert Glenn Ketchum



In 1993, I began traveling to the Arctic. I have been across The Northwest Passage by yacht; to the North Pole twice; to little-visited Russian islands; and aboard research vessels in Greenland, Labrador, Newfoundland, and Baffin Island, taking the opportunity to visit Iqualuit, the capital of Nunavut, the recently created Inuit nation and territories.
~Robert Glenn Ketchum



Wednesday, October 28, 2020

ARCTIC:  At the Cutting Edge of Climate Change, #220
ARCTIC, #220:  
The graphics of the light snow on these plateaus is remarkably diverse, and it is hard not to keep taking pictures. I am going through A LOT of film on this flight, but it is also near the end of the our Northwest Passage journey, so I am comfortable that I will still have enough to sustain the rest of the trip. For sure, I will likely not ever have another opportunity like this, so why not shoot away. Apparently, we are getting close to our supply delivery destination, Grise Fjord, because the pilots have established radio contact. I am at the other end of the plane from the cockpit, and I can’t hear the conversation clearly over the roar of the plane engines, but I do catch the advice that Grise is experiencing a good bit of fog, and it is suggested to our flight team that they “should be advised.” I am not sure what the result of that is going to be, but I am hoping it might clear up before our arrival. I don’t really want to be part of an attempted landing in a fjord with limited visibility.

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2020, @RobertGKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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Tuesday, October 27, 2020

Weekly Post, NO PEBBLE MINE: Pictures from Ground Zero by Robert Glenn Ketchum (#401+)

NO PEBBLE MINE Pictures from Ground Zero
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

 
Since 1998, I have been working to protect the spectacular resources of southwest Alaska and the fishery of Bristol Bay. Two Aperture books, a national traveling exhibition, a massive coalition of concerned users, and a lot of personal lobbying, had it looking like we were almost there. Then Donald Trump took office claiming he would always put America, and American jobs first. SO WHY destroy a BILLION-dollar-a-year, RENEWABLE salmon fishery and over 100,000 jobs for a group of international mineral speculators that will leave us with a Superfund site to clean up, and NO fishery left edible? And yet, he did,..so please, keep saying NO TO THE PEBBLE MINE!
~Robert Glenn Ketchum




Tuesday, October 27, 2020 

NO PEBBLE MINE #424, Pictures from Ground Zero
NO PEBBLE MINE #424:
As I will learn in future Alaskan adventures, the tundra comes a varied forms of diversity. It also is a rich fall experience, wherever it is located, A blog I will eventually post regards a float trip from Gates of Arctic, down the Noatak River, and it was late in the season, so the tundra was ablaze. Being much farther north, however, it was far less lush and biodiverse. Here in Southwest, the warmer clime, and the immense amount of rain, has created a Garden of Eden that is especially outrageous in the throes of fall. This is no place for the Pebble mine, proposed to be the largest open-pit mine in the world, nor for the vast acres of of toxic slurry that would be contained in open ponds, poisoning wildlife, and waiting for a major earthquake to set in free to flow into Bristol Bay and destroy the most productive fishery left in North America. PLEASE, SAY NO TO THE PEBBLE MINE. Preserve the bio-diversity, clean air and water, and the food resources of Southwest Alaska.

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2020, @RobertGKetchum @LittleBearProd @NRDC @OrvisFlyFishing #NoPebbleMine #LittleBearProd

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Weekly Post: THE TONGASS: Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees (#100+) by Robert Glenn Ketchum

THE TONGASS:  Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees
by Robert Glenn Ketchum


In 1985, I began a 2-year commission to explore the Tongass rainforest, the largest forest in the United States Forest Service (USFS) system AND the largest temperate rainforest in the world. It was a unique, old-growth environment under siege from industrial logging. The resulting investigative book I published helped to pass the Tongass Timber Reform Bill, protect 1,000,000 acres of old-growth, and create 11 new wilderness areas. This is the story of how that was achieved.



Tuesday, October 27, 2020

THE TONGASS:  Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees, #218
Tongass, #218:  
Bart Koehler has not been too happy about the blanket of fog and low clouds that hang above Prince of Wales Island, as he fears it will make landing at Tokeen either dangerous, or impossible, so he is relieved as we fly further west to see that the clouds are parting. Tokeen has a Native village nearby, and it also hosts a marble quarry managed by the University of Alaska, but we are going to visit a small complex of buildings that serve as the post office, and is also the home of Sylvia, who serves as postmaster. Sylvia has two daughters, and three dogs, while living a near-subsistence lifestyle. There are zero services at this remote outpost, so Sylvia both hunts and fishes to sustain the family, and occasionally, mail pilots will also bring her staples from Ketchikan. I will learn that both of her children home-schooled, and the big, barky dogs help keep the bears away. This visit is one of my first experiences to see an Alaskan family living so remotely.  
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2020, @RobertGKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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Monday, October 26, 2020

Weekly Post, High and Wild: Three Years of Wandering in the Wind Rivers (#101+)

High and Wild: Three Years of Wandering in the Wind Rivers
by Robert Glenn Ketchum



After receiving my MFA from CalArts, I was invited by Bill Lund, Sharon Disney’s husband, to come stay at the families' Diamond-D Ranch in Dubois, Wyoming. Bill thought I might like to photograph in the nearby Wind River Mountains, which I did, backpacking through them extensively over the next three summers. Welcome to a world of big granite walls and huge alpine lakes!
~Robert Glenn Ketchum



Monday, October 26, 2020

High and Wild:  Three Years of Wandering in the Wind Rivers, #166 
Wind Rivers, #166:  
The morning of our departure into the winter backcountry of the Wind River Range is clear and sunny. It is cold, but standing in the sun has warmth, and there is a lot of activity. Some ranching friends of the Skinner brothers, have invited us to stage from their home, and they will take us, and our loaded sleds, by snowmobile, across several miles of flat plains, into the foothills of the Winds, at which point we will be on our own. As the sleds are loaded, and the gear lashed down, the children of the ranchers look on as we prepare (above). The seated women is part of our expedition party, and the man standing to the left of her, is Monty Skinner, who, if the plans work out, will celebrate his 50th birthday with all of us on the 11,500ft + summit of Mount Baldy, before skiing down. Things are about to get started in a very big way. Some snowmobiles will just tow the ladened sleds. Others will tow two or three of us at a time on our skis, a tricky exercise to say the least. And, they're off!

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2020, @RobertGKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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SOCIAL MEDIA by  LittleBearProd
Wach Gallery:  Wach Gallery
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Weekly Post, GREENLAND, LABRADOR, and BAFFIN ISLAND: A Climate Change Research Expedition in the North Atlantic

GREENLAND, LABRADOR, and BAFFIN ISLAND:  A Climate Change Research Expedition in the North Atlantic 

 by Robert Glenn Ketchum


 
In 2006, I was invited to participate in a Zegrahm expedition sponsored by the Harvard Museum of Natural History, The Nature Conservancy, and the World Wildlife Fund. I was to lecture aboard the ship, and to participate onshore, when visiting Inuit communities to discuss the effects of climate change on their lives. The trip would travel along the coast of southeastern Greenland, crossing the Labrador Sea, to the northwest coast of Labrador, and the southwest coast of Baffin Island.
~Robert Glenn Ketchum




Monday, October 26, 2020 

GREENLAND, LABRADOR, and BAFFIN ISLAND:  A Climate Change Research Expedition in the North Atlantic, #3
GLB #3:  
In spite of the swarms of mosquitoes, the day of hiking in Ikamiut Fjord consisted of a spectacular setting, full of surging rivers connecting numerous large lakes, and all surrounded by some seriously rugged mountains, many of which hosted descending glaciers. This picture made late in the day, before returning to our boat, shows exactly that. Towering above one of the uppermost lakes on our hike, this sheer face, streaming glaciers, is typical of the mountains surrounding us, and above the summits to the east, everything is buried beneath the vast Greenland icecap that spans the entire island from coast to coast.

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2020, @RobertGKetchum @LittleBearProd   #LittleBearProd

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SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd:  LittleBearProd
Wach Gallery:  Wach Gallery

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Thursday, October 22, 2020

Welcome to Hotel California: Some Pictures from My Backyard by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Welcome To Hotel California:  Some Pictures From My Backyard
by Robert Glenn Ketchum



I was born, and grew up in Los Angeles. As my professional career developed, I traveled around the world working on various commissions, but seldom had opportunities to work in California. Nonetheless, I always came back “home,” and when there, I occasionally took pictures. For ten years I also taught a photography workshop on the Mendocino coast that provided some great visual moments as well. There is no “project” unifying these images, they are just my way of showing, “You can check out any time you like, but you can never leave.”   ~Robert Glenn Ketchum



Thursday, October 22, 2020

Hotel California, Some Pictures From My Backyard, #61
California #61:  
A lesson in relative scale. That is the VERY large Kaweah River dwarfed by the foothills of Sequoia National Park.

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2020, @RobertGKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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Monday, October 5, 2020

Weekly Post: The Higher You Get, The Higher You Get by Robert Glenn Ketchum

by Robert Glenn Ketchum


Growing up my parents had a home near Sun Valley, Idaho. It was there that I learned to ski. Over many years I befriended members of the Decker Flats Climbing and Frisbee Club, with whom I had both life, and art-forming outdoor experiences. I had my camera, and these are my adventures. Enjoy!!  
~Robert Glenn Ketchum



Monday, October 52020

The Higher You Get, The Higher You Get - Sun Valley and the DFC&FC, #231  
DFCFC, #231:  
Of all the birthday presents that I received over the years from Gordon Williams, my most loved and used, are two very clever camp chairs that he gave to Vicki Golden, and I, so we would not have to sit on the ground when van camping. My tricked-out van was a Dodge Tradesman, and it was not all that big, so for the two of us to live in it for months at a time, everything had to have a place. I designed stashes around the wheel wells for the freeze-dried food storage that we took backpacking. I had a print drawer for my big prints, in a shallow box with a lid on it beneath the platform that supported our mattress. Opposite the double-wide side doors, was our pantry, clothes closet, and a cooler storage for cameras, and particularly, film. The two front seats were Captain’s Chairs, and mine nearly abutted the clothes closet wall, but there was about a 5” clearance. Knowing the van, Gordon designed these two camp chairs to fit in that space when not being used. Folded down, the seat locks flush to the “back,” creating a very thin profile. In use, you pull the “seat” out of the “back,” reverse it so the slant “feet” face the ground, and then slide it back through the braces of the “back", to form the sitting chair. I have had these camp chairs for over 50yrs. now, and they have graced the ground, and the roof rack on top of the van, at camps in almost every state in this country. I took this picture this morning, and they still look this good, and are now getting used at my beach house. Thank you Gordon, for being a GREAT friend, a mentor, and for giving gifts to me, that still keep on giving. May you Rest In Peace!

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2020, @RobertGKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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