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Friday, May 29, 2020

The Daze of My Life: Robert Glenn Ketchum, An Autobiography

The Daze of My Life:  Robert Glenn Ketchum, An Autobiography


Biographies are studies of someone's life based on cumulative research. Good ones may reveal something, but probably barely scratch the surface of what actually went on. The internet is allowing me to do something VERY different. 
~Robert Glenn Ketchum




Friday, May 29, 2020

The Daze of My Life:  Robert Glenn Ketchum, An Autobiography #202:
Daze, #202:  In 1990, after 4-years of lobbying and exhibiting to promote the Tongass Timber Reform Act, it is finally passed and signed into to law by President George H.W. Bush. My Aperture book, The Tongass Alaska’s Vanishing Rain Forest, is widely credited with helping this get done, so in 1991, I am given the United Nations Global 500 Outstanding Environmental Achievement Award, and invited to the White House for an audience with the President. Aperture also publishes my third book, Overlooked in America: The Success and Failure of Federal Land Management. The images in this book were all created in the Cuyahoga National Recreation Area, where I previously completed a commission from the Akron Art Museum, and the National Park Service. The print work is toured by the museum extensively, but they do not want the expense of publishing a book. I am an “information collector” about various subjects that interest me, and I clip and file articles and news stories that I find related to those subjects. One of those has always been the management of public lands by the government, for which I have collected articles for more than 15-years. With funding several supportive donors, I re-purpose the Cuyahoga Valley imagery as “generic” American landscapes, and I draft paragraphic “bytes” about various land management issues and locations - some good, some bad - that span our 50 states. Interestingly, my accumulated clippings reveal how the span of time has shown progress in some cases, and serious decline in others. It is VERY revealing. I am also honored to have Charles Callison, one of the foremost authors on this subject matter, write a caustic essay for the book as well. Michael Hoffman, CEO of Aperture, says he is glad the pictures in the book are spectacular, because he thinks the short bytes, and Callison’s essay, are VERY dark. With the help of several non-profit environmental groups, this publication is handed out the the Congress, and I gift one to the President and his wife, Barbara, when we meet in the White House.If you are interested in seeing more images created during this commission, click here

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2020 
@RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism Online:
TWITTER:  http://www.twitter.com/RbtGlennKetchum
PINTEREST:  pinterest.com/LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd:  LittleBearProd
Wach Gallery:  Wach Gallery
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Weekly Post, THE CUYAHOGA RIVER VALLEY: From Flames to Fame by Robert Glenn Ketchum

THE CUYAHOGA RIVER VALLEY: 
From Flames to Fame
by Robert Glenn Ketchum



In 1986, I was given a commission from the Akron Art Museum and the National Park Service to photograph the recently created Cuyahoga Valley National Recreation Area. My work helped put that location on the map, and since then, the NRA has been upgraded to National Park status, becoming one of the most visited parks in the national system.
~Robert Glenn Ketchum





Friday, May 29, 2020

Cuyahoga River Valley:  From Flames to Fame #11:
Cuyahoga #11:  Let’s take a break from CVNRA history, and go for a 4-season walk in the park. There are MANY great trails, and public access points as you can see here from the discreet staircase leading down to the water’s edge - a great place to sit and ponder at the height of fall, or to seek cooling refuge in the heat of summer.

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2020, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism Online:
PINTEREST:  pinterest.com/LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd:  LittleBearProd
Wach Gallery:  Wach Gallery

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Thursday, May 28, 2020

Welcome to Hotel California: Some Pictures from My Backyard by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Welcome To Hotel California:  Some Pictures From My Backyard
by Robert Glenn Ketchum



I was born, and grew up in Los Angeles. As my professional career developed, I traveled around the world working on various commissions, but seldom had opportunities to work in California. Nonetheless, I always came back “home,” and when there, I occasionally took pictures. For ten years I also taught a photography workshop on the Mendocino coast that provided some great visual moments as well. There is no “project” unifying these images, they are just my way of showing, “You can check out any time you like, but you can never leave.”   ~Robert Glenn Ketchum




Thursday, May 28, 2020

Hotel California, Some Pictures From My Backyard, #40:
California #40:  By the light of the silvery lagoon, somewhere between Cayucos and Harmony.

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2020, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism Online:
PINTEREST:  pinterest.com/LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd:  LittleBearProd
Wach Gallery:  Wach Gallery

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Weekly Post, SUNDANCE: Artist-In-Residence by Robert Glenn Ketchum

SUNDANCE:  Artist In Residence
by Robert Glenn Ketchum



From 1987-1989, Robert Redford invited me to become the first visual Artist-In-Residence at his newly established Sundance Institute, part of the community he was building around his recently purchased ski resort in Utah. The residency provided me with subject matter that produced some of the most significant images of my career, but importantly, it also afforded me my first aerial work, a platform that would become increasingly important throughout my life. A limited amount of these images were ever published, and NONE of the aerials ever were. The best will now appear, please enjoy!  ~Robert Glenn Ketchum





Thursday, May 28, 2020

SUNDANCE: Artist In Residence, #98
Sundance #98  And, down in the valley below.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2020, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism Online:
PINTEREST:  pinterest.com/LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd:  LittleBearProd
Wach Gallery:  Wach Gallery
____________________________________________________

Wednesday, May 27, 2020

Weekly Post, THE SONORAN DESERT: Visiting with Don Juan by Robert Glenn Ketchum

THE SONORAN DESERT: 
Visiting with Don Juan
by Robert Glenn Ketchum



In 1988, I was contacted by Luther Propst, Director of the Rincon Institute of Tucson, AZ, who asked me if I could help them devise a campaign to protect a part of Saguaro National Monument from a massive real estate development that would disrupt substantial habitat.  
I did so, and we not only succeeded in mitigating the development, we added 30,000 acres to the monument, and got it upgraded to National Park status.  While doing this work, I fell in love with the Sonoran Desert, returning to it repeatedly, and visiting the many varied parts of it in Arizona, Mexico, and Baja, CA.  This is the tale of those visits. 
~Robert Glenn Ketchum





Wednesday, May 27, 2020

THE SONORAN DESERT:  Visiting with Don Juan #6:
Sonora #6:  It is called Saguaro National Monument and there are definitely numerous saguaro here, but there is SO much more. There are trees, varied grasses, moss covered rocks, lichen covered rocks, and an endless array of cacti. Many cacti also have a large diversity within just one species. There are many different barrel cactus, some of which are HUGE. There are ocotillo. There is a huge array of cholla, not just the “jumping” ones (post #4). Some are tree-like, some, like the teddy-bear, look fuzzy and stay low to the ground. There are several varieties of prickly pear, and also several varieties of cylindropuntia. Say what? (You will see a magnificent one of these in next week’s post.) In the image above there are quite a number of different grasses and trees, several different species of prickly pear, and dead center in this picture IS a cylindropuntia. Can you find it? What beautiful chaos!

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2020, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism Online:
PINTEREST:  pinterest.com/LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd:  LittleBearProd
Wach Gallery:  Wach Gallery

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Friday, May 22, 2020

NRDC, Pebble Mine: Open Letter to Morgan Stanley CEO James Gorman

EXPERT BLOG › JOEL REYNOLDS



Pebble Mine: Open Letter to Morgan Stanley CEO James Gorman

May 18, 2020
Joel Reynolds

Bristol Bay coalition urges Morgan Stanley to cut ties with widely-condemned Pebble Mine, citing unavoidable risks to the region, inconsistency with Morgan Stanley’s commitment to corporate environmental and social responsibility.

"Nushagak River, Bristol Bay Watershed"
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2020 



James Gorman
Chairman and CEO
Morgan Stanley
1585 Broadway Avenue
New York, NY
USA 10036


Re: Northern Dynasty Minerals and the Pebble Mine
Dear Mr. Gorman:

Over the past two months, on behalf of the Natural Resources Defense Council and leaders from the Bristol Bay region of Alaska, we have reached out to you here and here for essentially two reasons:

First, we are concerned that Morgan Stanley continues to be associated publicly as a major shareholder in Northern Dynasty Minerals, the sole owner of one of the most widely condemned projects anywhere today.  The Pebble Mine is a project (1) that threatens the greatest wild sockeye salmon fishery on Earth, (2) that the people of Bristol Bay, by overwhelming numbers for over a decade, have opposed, (3) that four major global mining companies have abandoned, (4) that the World Conservation Congress has condemned by virtually unanimous vote, (5) that Tiffany’s and scores of other jewelry companies have blacklisted, (6) that EPA Administrators from the Presidencies of Nixon, Reagan, George H.W. Bush and George W. Bush have called “the wrong mine in absolutely the wrong place” – and more. While your colleagues have emphasized in reply that Morgan Stanley “does not have a strategic or proprietary investment in the company,” your public profile as a major institutional investor in the company continues to convey a different, however unintended, impression – one of participation in a project that is environmentally destructive, socially irresponsible, and relentlessly opposed by the people of the region. Under the Trump Administration, in disregard of all of this, the project is nearing a permit decision, with Morgan Stanley high on its list of investors.

Second, as is evident on your website, there is no doubt that Morgan Stanley has a commitment to sustainability and sensitivity to the environmental and social concerns that have motivated the diverse, sustained opposition to the Pebble Mine. Indeed, your unambiguous rejection of the kinds of risks that Northern Dynasty and its pursuit of its reckless project pose in a very direct and immediate way to the communities of Bristol Bay is an important consideration in reaching out to you. Pebble’s risks are not an abstract concept nor are they going to go away in the absence of specific, concrete, and public action by leaders like Morgan Stanley – to whom investors look for investment guidance. As you have recognized, this is a matter of sustainable long-term investment, not just fundamental values.

Objectively, the Pebble Mine is a bad social, environmental, and financial investment. Given this, we ask what it is that you and your colleagues at Morgan Stanley hope to hear from Northern Dynasty Minerals, the Army Corps of Engineers, or anyone else that, in the face of this unreasonable risk and broad-based condemnation, could justify proceeding with such a project in such a place? While we have no reason to doubt the assurances of your colleagues that you are “mindful of the impacts,” you will “continue to monitor the project and company,” or that you “remain sensitive to the environmental and social issues” that we’ve raised, we believe that the circumstances demand more than words.

To that end, as Northern Dynasty continues its single-minded pursuit of permits and investors for this uniquely destructive project, we urge you to consider what specific actions Morgan Stanley can take to publicly dissociate itself, its resources, and its services from the Pebble Mine and from the company that owns it.

Very truly yours,

Joel Reynolds

Western Director
Senior Attorney
Natural Resources Defense Council
Take action now to stop the Pebble Mine.

Orvis Supports No Pebble Mine

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