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Monday, February 8, 2016

Gung Hay Fat Choy! Happy New Year 2016!



Gung Hay Fat Choy! Happy New Year 2016!


Welcome to the Year of the Red Monkey. How about the serendipity of that considering the color of Donald Trump's hair (LOL)? Who knows where 2016 is going, so this is to wish us all safe journey, BUT I am happy to report I ended 2015 on a high note that has now carried forward into the New Year, so please read on.

photograph _ copyright  Robert Glenn Ketchum 2016
photograph © copyright Robert Glenn Ketchum 2016

Weekly Post: THE HUDSON RIVER AND THE HIGHLANDS by Robert Glenn Ketchum

by Robert Glenn Ketchum

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This is the story of my first major commission and book, THE HUDSON RIVER AND THE HIGHLANDS (Aperture, 1985). In 1984, #StephenShore, #WilliamClift, and I received a 2-year commission from the Lila Acheson Wallace Fund to photograph the #HudsonRiverValley. This blog tells the tale of the book, with many photos not seen before. Enjoy!


Monday, February 8, 2016
'Twilight in the Wilderness', 1860. Frederic Edwin Church (American, 1826-1900). The Cleveland Museum of Art. Oil on canvas, Framed: 124.00 x 185.00 x 13.00 cm (48 13/16 x 72 13/16 x 5 1/16 inches); Unframed: 101.60 x 162.60 cm (40 x 64 inches). Mr. and Mrs. William H. Marlatt Fund 1965.233

THE HUDSON RIVER AND THE HIGHLANDS #175:
HUDSON RIVER #175:  Like most mountain ranges, the #Catskills support a diverse lake system. As a last tribute to this interesting part of the #HudsonRiverValley before continuing our journey upriver, I thought I would leave you with the ultimate rendering of a Catskill lake. Along with #ThomasCole, #FredericEdwinChurch is considered one of the most important painters in the #HudsonRiverSchool. In the post next week I will show you a winter view from his home #Olana, which sits across the river and has a view of the range. Here, however, is a very different perspective, Church’s stunning, “Twilight in the Wilderness.” HEY, PHOTOGRAPHERS! Did he get this right ?
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2016, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd @Wallacefdn @Aperturefnd @PentaxOnline
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Friday, February 5, 2016

Weekly Post: SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient by Robert Glenn Ketchum

SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient by Robert Glenn Ketchum

During the reign of Mao (1949-1976), China was a closed country. China in the 1980’s was 80% rural, with no outside visitors, particularly from the West. When China opened to travelers, the Chinese government placed severe limitations on who was allowed to enter the country. These photographs are a continuation of other ongoing blog threads of the first glimpses into China in the mid-1980’s by world-renowned Conservation Photographer Robert Glenn Ketchum.




Friday, February 5, 2016


SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient, #102
SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient #102 - 1985 to the Present:  The restoration of #Shanghai’s “old town” was opulent and at the surface remained faithful to historic tradition. Taking it all in, I continued to wander in the twisting (and crowded) pedestrian streets and hallways that wound around through the buildings. I was not surprised to find odd signage in English, but I am not sure I was fully prepared for this moment of inevitability. Rounding a corner to enter a more open plaza, the English signage suddenly became all too clear: DQ! Whaaaat? I guess the #Chinese really love ice cream because of the many franchises to establish themselves early in the game, Kentucky Fried Chicken (@KFC) was one of the first, but they were quickly followed by Häagen-Dazs (@HaagenDazs_US), and Dairy Queen (@DairyQueen) which seemed to sprout up quite literally EVERYWHERE.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2016, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #China #Shanghai

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Thursday, February 4, 2016

Weekly Post: SUZHOU, 1985-to the present by RobertGlennKetchum

Welcome to Suzhou, 1985 - to the present by Robert Glenn Ketchum

During the reign of Mao (1949-1976), China was a closed country. China in the 1980’s was 80% rural, with no outside visitors, particularly from the West. When China opened to travelers, the Chinese government placed severe limitations on who was allowed to enter the country. These photographs are a continuation of other ongoing blog threads of the first glimpses into China in the mid-1980’s by world-renowned Conservation Photographer 
Robert Glenn Ketchum.




Thursday, February 4, 2016

Welcome to Suzhou, 1985 - to the present, #103
Suzhou #103:  The “appropriated” sidewalks tended to occur most on smaller side streets rather than the more trafficked avenues. In some concentrated blocks the accumulation of goods made walking and window-shopping like navigating an obstacle course. Supporting that concept, as I stopped to take this picture of a rather aggressive appropriation, the elderly woman walked through alternately muttering to herself, and then speaking loudly. When I asked my associate what she was saying, I was told she was berating the storeowner for blocking her path and telling him that she expected a discount if she ever had to shop there. (LOL)
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2016, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #China #Suzhou

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Weekly Post: SILK ROAD - Embroideries of Robert Glenn Ketchum

Silk Road - Embroideries of Robert Glenn Ketchum


The city of Suzhou, China, produced China's most beautiful silk and silk embroidery practiced by generational families for 3,000 years. My purpose in going to China starting in the mid-1980's was to turn my photographs into textiles, and this is my story. ~Robert Glenn Ketchum




Thursday, February 4, 2016

Silk Road - Embroideries #159
SILK ROAD #159:   Inspired by a window frame pattern she encountered during a reflective moment in a #Suzhougarden, Zhang guided the embroiderers to create this, the VERY FIRST chuo sha border to ever be done with a black pattern design. In this detail you can see the careful attention to the “randomness” of the pattern, rather than a balanced or repeating one. I think the distinct separation of the border design and the image in this piece is especially striking, made more so by some of the elaborate and layered stitching used to render the accumulated snow and the surface of the trees.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2016, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #Embroidery @WesCFA @RSSDesigns
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Wednesday, February 3, 2016

Weekly Post: TATSHESHINI: Saving a River Wild

TATSHENSHINI:  Saving a River Wild by Robert Glenn Ketchum


In 1990, I was invited on a 10-day float down the Tatshenshini, a huge river system flowing from Western Canada to the Pacific Ocean that literally divides two of North America's largest national parks, Canada's Kluane National Park and Alaska's Glacier Bay National Park. A gold mine was being proposed mid-river. I broke the story in LIFE magazine. There were many other articles and a book. The mine was never developed and the river is now a wilderness corridor. This is a conservation SUCCESS story!





Wednesday, February 3, 2016

TATSHENSHINI:  Saving a River Wild, #87
TATSHENSHINI:  Saving a River Wild, #87:  With camp set, I grabbed my camera and headed “inland,” away from the sandy shoreline and toward the older most established part of the bar that was covered with some soil and a good deal of vegetation. Upon approaching the first patch of grasses, I realized our trip had been blessed with some remarkable timing. EVERYTHING was blooming – grasses, flowers, small shrubs - yeow! The window for this spectacle was less than two weeks and we had arrived, pretty much, AT THE PEAK. Look at those concentrations of bloom (and 26 glaciers),..and for the moment it has become dead still.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2016, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #Tatshenshini @glacierbaynps @Life @Wilderness #WeAreTheWild @nature_AK

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Weekly Post: NO PEBBLE MINE: Pictures from Ground Zero by RobertGlennKetchum

NO PEBBLE MINE Pictures from Ground Zero 
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Thank you to the EPA for recognizing the value of the Bristol Bay fishery. 
NOW, what can we do to protect this habitat further? 
Mission: To protect the national parks and national refuges of southwest Alaska, 
and the Bristol Bay fishery from the development of the Pebble mine, and other commercial risks.





Wednesday, February 3, 2016 

NO PEBBLE MINE #177, Pictures from Ground Zero:
NO PEBBLE MINE #177, Pictures from Ground Zero:  From this POV we are practically above the proposed Pebble mine site. On the other side of the large hill is the headwater of #TalarikCreek and beyond that you can see the broad shoreline of #LakeIliamna. Below us the meanders of the #Koktuli and the #Stuyahok wend their way downstream from the site to their juncture with the #Mulchatna, and ultimately the #Nushagak. We are looking at some of the most productive salmon headwaters in the world. This is NO place for a cyanide-leach gold mine and tailings lagoon. PLEASE!!!! SAY NO TO THE PEBBLE MINE!
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2016, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd @NRDC @OrvisFlyFishing #NoPebbleMine #LittleBearProd

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Tuesday, February 2, 2016

Where It All Began: LIMEKILN CREEK by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Where It All Began:  Limekiln Creek by Robert Glenn Ketchum

In 1967, I discovered Limekiln Creek on the Big Sur Coast in California. Among those redwoods, I had an epiphany as a young artist. As a photographer, most of the skills I would use, I would learn there. Many years later in a mature career, I helped the American Land Conservancy acquire this property for the California State Park system. This is the story of a very personal place.


Tuesday, February 2, 2016

Where It All Began:   Limekiln Creek, #5
Where It All Began:   Limekiln Creek, #5:  Walking away from the camps, the valley floor narrowed and closed and a steep notch concentrated the creek in a series of falls and pools, but it also cut me off from approaching the deeper canyons. There were no established trails here, but in looking around I realized the “path” led up through the roots and onto the trunk of a fallen redwood that bridged the stream. This was just the beginning. This trail would become far more “organic” as the day wore on. I did not know it at the time, but when I stood before the forest that morning, I was gazing into my future, BOTH artistically and intellectually. My career as a photographer would fine-tune itself in these woods. My life as a conservation advocate would be born here. Limekiln would offer up some of the MOST difficult photographic challenges and complex personal introspections I would ever confront. To start with though – no tripod; crazy-extreme highlight/shade relations; shadows dark enough to need multi-second exposures; constant breezes; slippery! rocks; AND POISON OAK. Hey! I was a #RobertHeinecken student! I didn’t know anything about the #zonesystem, but I knew how to HAVE FUN with the image-making process. 
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2016, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd, #LittleBearProd, ALC (@american_land), Monterey Pop Festival (@MontereyPopFest)
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Orvis Supports No Pebble Mine

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