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Monday, May 30, 2016

Where It All Began: LIMEKILN CREEK by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Where It All Began:  Limekiln Creek by Robert Glenn Ketchum

In 1967, I discovered Limekiln Creek on the Big Sur Coast in California. Among those redwoods, I had an epiphany as a young artist. As a photographer, most of the skills I would use, I would learn there. Many years later in a mature career, I helped the American Land Conservancy acquire this property for the California State Park system. This is the story of a very personal place.



Monday, May 30, 2016

Where It All Began:   Limekiln Creek, #22
Where It All Began:   Limekiln Creek, #22:  Out of curiosity and over many visits, my friends and I explored all the canyons/streams as they narrowed and climbed ever higher into the Nacimiento meadows of the Big Sur coastal range. Often in the summer, a dense, wet fog would hug the coast and enshroud the canyon and trees making them drip like it was raining. If this lasted most of the day, we abandoned the forest by hiking up through it to the headwaters in the meadows above. At the elevation of the meadows you were above the fog line, often in blazing sunshine. If you study this image, you can see the tip-tops of big redwoods that are emerging from that dark narrow crack of a canyon. That canyon is Limekiln, and REALLY steep, narrow, and rugged at this point. The meadows are also VERY STEEP, but really sunny and a great place to eat, libate, get naked, and party - do pay attention to the poison oak, however.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2016, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd, #LittleBearProd, ALC (@american_land), Monterey Pop Festival (@MontereyPopFest)
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Friday, May 27, 2016

Weekly Post: SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient by Robert Glenn Ketchum

SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient by Robert Glenn Ketchum

During the reign of Mao (1949-1976), China was a closed country. China in the 1980’s was 80% rural, with no outside visitors, particularly from the West. When China opened to travelers, the Chinese government placed severe limitations on who was allowed to enter the country. These photographs are a continuation of other ongoing blog threads of the first glimpses into China in the mid-1980’s by world-renowned Conservation Photographer Robert Glenn Ketchum.




Friday, May 27, 2016


SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient, #118
SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient #118 - 1985 to the Present:   In the growing forest of ever-taller toadstools (I refer to the Jin Mao tower and the Shanghai World Financial Center, I was walking one night and I wandered into a park that offered some dramatic views of the towers and the broad avenue. Appropriate to a humid "forest" I suppose, this park had VERY large snails that were also there taking in the night air while watching over the passing humans. Just one more of those odd discoveries around any given corner in Shanghai. I wonder if anyone has tried to eat these yet?
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2016, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #China #Shanghai

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Thursday, May 26, 2016

Weekly Post: SUZHOU, 1985-to the present by RobertGlennKetchum

Welcome to Suzhou, 1985 - to the present by Robert Glenn Ketchum

During the reign of Mao (1949-1976), China was a closed country. China in the 1980’s was 80% rural, with no outside visitors, particularly from the West. When China opened to travelers, the Chinese government placed severe limitations on who was allowed to enter the country. These photographs are a continuation of other ongoing blog threads of the first glimpses into China in the mid-1980’s by world-renowned Conservation Photographer 
Robert Glenn Ketchum.



Thursday, May 26, 2016

Welcome to Suzhou, 1985 - to the present, #119
Suzhou #119:   In the course of my photographic career, I have often been accused of making a lot of pictures WITHOUT people in them. Once I began to shoot on the street in #China, however, I doubted I would be able to make a picture that did NOT HAVE people in it because they were everywhere. Thus as my colleagues and I enjoyed a most excellent meal, it did seem increasingly strange that the surrounding "new city" was SO quiet. There ARE actually two people on the bridge in this image, but I must have a hundred moon-gate bridge shots around the city, and those images are swarming with people and the bridge traffic is bustling. Regardless of it being a bit odd, it was a lovely, warm evening with friends - and when the sun goes down, the lights will come on!
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2016, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #China #Suzhou

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Weekly Post: SILK ROAD - Embroideries of Robert Glenn Ketchum

Silk Road - Embroideries of Robert Glenn Ketchum


The city of Suzhou, China, produced China's most beautiful silk and silk embroidery practiced by generational families for 3,000 years. My purpose in going to China starting in the mid-1980's was to turn my photographs into textiles, and this is my story. ~Robert Glenn Ketchum



Thursday, May 26, 2016

Silk Road - Embroideries #175
SILK ROAD #175:   Now, let's return to the entire embroidery considering what we now know about the way it displays. This was post #167 when I first introduced you to this image, but upon second look, if you have been following what we have done, you will notice the rather "flat" black of the tree trunks that is atypical of the luster of silk embroidery. As previous posts illustrated, the trunks have no stitches and have been selectively dyed black, and they become transparent when the lighting is reversed. You have seen the result in the preceding details, now let's look at the whole piece illuminated from behind the screen.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2016, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #Embroidery @WesCFA @RSSDesigns
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Wednesday, May 25, 2016

Weekly Post: TATSHESHINI: Saving a River Wild

TATSHENSHINI:  Saving a River Wild by Robert Glenn Ketchum


In 1990, I was invited on a 10-day float down the Tatshenshini, a huge river system flowing from Western Canada to the Pacific Ocean that literally divides two of North America's largest national parks, Canada's Kluane National Park and Alaska's Glacier Bay National Park. A gold mine was being proposed mid-river. I broke the story in LIFE magazine. There were many other articles and a book. The mine was never developed and the river is now a wilderness corridor. This is a conservation SUCCESS story!



Wednesday, May 25, 2016

TATSHENSHINI:  Saving a River Wild, #103
TATSHENSHINI:  Saving a River Wild, #103: Now yours truly has caught that silly-smile thing from @YousefKhanfar - it must be the day! Hot, balmy warm winds, guides in shorts and bathing suits, and the spectacle of Alsek Lake that will appear later - a PERFECT trip except for the hole-in-the-bottom-of-the-boat moment on the first day. Now we are about to launch for our drift of the last section of the Tatshenshini and sometime late this afternoon we hope to have lunch on a sandy spit just before entering the lake. If you have been following this blog from the beginning, you will know I have been on that beach before. My last visit found vast amounts of driftwood on the lakeshore side of the spit, lots of evidence of bear, and a panoramic view of Alsek Lake and the north side of Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve with 15,000ft + Mt. Fairweather dominating the skyline. I can hardly wait to return.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2016, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #Tatshenshini @glacierbaynps @Life @Wilderness #WeAreTheWild @nature_AK

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Weekly Post: NO PEBBLE MINE: Pictures from Ground Zero by RobertGlennKetchum

NO PEBBLE MINE Pictures from Ground Zero 
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Thank you to the EPA for recognizing the value of the Bristol Bay fishery. 
NOW, what can we do to protect this habitat further? 
Mission: To protect the national parks and national refuges of southwest Alaska, 
and the Bristol Bay fishery from the development of the Pebble mine, and other commercial risks.


Wednesday, May 25, 2016 

NO PEBBLE MINE #193, Pictures from Ground Zero:
NO PEBBLE MINE #193, Pictures from Ground Zero:   A map view at this point will help put Wood-Tikchik State Park in perspective. This map provided to the public by the State of Alaska Department of Natural Resources clearly shows how the big, fjord-like lakes have been formed at the foot of the Wood Mountains. Those lakes to the south are closest to the town of Dillingham and are actually reached by a road that comes right to the edge of the park. As you move north through the lake chain, however, you move into ever wilder sections of the park. Near the center of this map you can see Nuyakuk Lake, which has been measured to 900ft in depth, and many believe is home to a Loch Ness-type creature. Just where that lake narrows and extends to the east (left), you will also see the designated site of Tikchik Narrows Lodge. This will be our base camp for a while as we tour the park's diverse terrain, thanks to the generosity of Bud Hodson and his staff and clients.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2016, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd @NRDC @OrvisFlyFishing #NoPebbleMine #LittleBearProd

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Tuesday, May 24, 2016

Weekly Post: TRACY ARM WILDERNESS - An Alaskan Kayak "Trip" Through Time by Robert Glenn Ketchum

TRACY ARM WILDERNESS - An Alaskan Kayak "Trip" Through Time by Robert Glenn Ketchum

To celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the Wilderness Act (#Wilderness), this new blog focuses on a wilderness area in the #Tongass rainforest of southeast Alaska. This is the tale of a 10-day kayak trip - a testament to WHY wilderness is important, by world-renowned Conservation Photographer Robert Glenn Ketchum.




Tuesday, May 24, 2016

TRACY ARM Wilderness - An Alaskan Kayak "Trip" Through Time, #92
TRACY ARM Wilderness - An Alaskan Kayak "Trip" Through Time, #92:  Well, this is our gamble - we are playing against the highest/lowest tide of the year. At the moment, the tide is running out as the area directly behind the blue tarp IS A BAY and all you can see now is the seaweed covering the rocky bottom. The camp we have chosen has many positives: there are big rocks that won't be washed away that we are using as anchors for the kitchen tarp; the big log had water half way up during last nights tide, BUT DID NOT FLOAT, so we are hoping that will also be the case tonight. It is the ONLY high and dry spot for our gear, besides repacking the boats. It also makes a great kitchen service ledge, and if you have not noticed, it is now the anchor for our kayaks. We KNOW they will float tonight, we are trusting the log does not or they will all be gone in the morning. The tents (just visible in middle, left) are as far back into the dense reeds as we can pitch them, but even there we can see seaweed wound through the grasses, so we know SOME water will reach us, the question is how much? Stay tuned for the answers at 2 a.m.!
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2016, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd @Wilderness #Wilderness #Tongass

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Monday, May 2, 2016

Weekly Post: THE HUDSON RIVER AND THE HIGHLANDS by Robert Glenn Ketchum

by Robert Glenn Ketchum


This is the story of my first major commission and book, THE HUDSON RIVER AND THE HIGHLANDS (Aperture, 1985). In 1984, #StephenShore, #WilliamClift, and I received a 2-year commission from the Lila Acheson Wallace Fund to photograph the #HudsonRiverValley. This blog tells the tale of the book, with many photos not seen before. Enjoy!




Monday, May 2, 2016


THE HUDSON RIVER AND THE HIGHLANDS #187:
HUDSON RIVER #187:   I thought I would end this blog with this image because most of what you have seen in my posts of the #HudsonRiver have been the "lower" river, a much bigger, broader body of water than these two small streams. However, from small streams, greater rivers grow. The Hudson is born from a small, somewhat swampy pond in the higher elevations of #Mt.Marcy, at 5,344ft, the tallest peak in #NewYorkState. #LakeTearOfTheClouds spawns a rivulet that is debatably acknowledged as the source of the Hudson, but others argue the #OpalescentRiver is the source. Regardless, before you lies their juncture. The Hudson comes in from the left, and the Opalescent from the right. A definitive view point, a beautiful fall day, the ruins of some old stone architecture, and not a #HudsonRiverSchool painter in sight. I hope you have enjoyed this body of my work. Although my Hudson River blog is ending, I am using my blogs as my autobiography, so we are starting a new post which I hope you will follow: THE HIGHER YOU GET, THE HIGHER YOU GET - Sun Valley and the Decker Flat Climbing and Frisbee Club.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2016, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd @Wallacefdn @Aperturefnd @PentaxOnline
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Orvis Supports No Pebble Mine

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