Orvis ®

icon icon

Wednesday, August 23, 2017

Weekly Post: Adventuring on the Yakutat Forelands - Bowing before St. Elias by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Adventuring on the Yakutat Forelands - Bowing before St. Elias
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

The Yakutat Forelands are where the Tongass rainforest and the Chugach forest to the north meet. It is also home to many large glaciers, a stunning coastline, the huge Alsek-Tatshenshini river, and Icy Bay, which sits at the foot of Mount St. Elias, the greatest vertical rise from sea level in the world. There is a lot of powerful energy out here.




Wednesday, August 23, 2017

Adventuring on the Yakutat Forelands - Bowing before St. Elias, #33:
The Yakutat Forelands, #33: It is getting dark, we are definitely a little looney, and thus I have a looney idea that seems to make sense. The brush we fought through climbing up here is horrifically dense, and laden with spiny Devil’s Club which we will NEVER see going down in the dark. Our best solution is to get down as quickly as possible, while touching as little as possible. I suggest we put on all our gear, including glove layers, then pull up our rain-hoodies and tie them in place, and simply plunge into the ravine of brush. I believe it is so dense that we will not “fall” through into the ravine, but rather just thrash around in it, while we slide downhill through it. My suggestion is met with some hysterical laughter, UNTIL they realize I am COMPLETELY SERIOUS, and offer to be living proof the idea works, by collecting my cameras tightly around me and plunging. In the bush is like a being on a soggy mat that is trying to suck you down into the undergrowth, but if you wriggle and thrash, you move more forward and downhill, than down into the depths of the ravine. In a matter of minutes I am standing at the base of the knoll, in close walking distance to the cabin, and those that were previously skeptical above can be heard now thrashing in the bushes. Back in the warm cabin, we are exhausted and sleep well during the night, hoping the weather holds and makes our airplane pick-up in the morning effortless. The day does dawn radiantly clear, we rise and pack, and like beautiful clockwork, Mike Ivers, our pilot, appears in the sky above. With little sidewind, the landing is simple, and in a very short amount of time, we are airborne again. Flying off Tanis Mesa and headed back to Yakutat takes us directly over the Alsek-Tatshenshini river system, and down below, hidden in the trees, is the 1st cabin we stayed in when we began this adventure onto the Forelands. It has been a MOST ENLIGHTENING 10 days! Now Yakutat is going to offer us a very different kind of “excitement."
photograph(s) © copyright, Robert Glenn Ketchum, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum, @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
____________________________________________________

Weekly Post:, ARCTIC: At the Cutting Edge of Climate Change

ARCTIC:  At the Cutting Edge of Climate Change
by Robert Glenn Ketchum



In 1993, I began traveling to the Arctic. I have been across The Northwest Passage by yacht; to the North Pole twice; to little-visited Russian islands; and aboard research vessels in Greenland, Labrador, Newfoundland, and Baffin Island, taking the opportunity to visit Iqualuit, the capital of Nunavut, the recently created Inuit nation and territories.













Wednesday, August 23, 2017

ARCTIC:  At the Cutting Edge of Climate Change, #54:
ARCTIC, #54: Because John Bockstoce has “relatives” in Gjoa Haven, we are going to be ashore for several hours, and I am really excited because it will give me time to study the village a bit, rather than just running quickly around taking whatever pictures I can, which is what I have had to do on shorter visits elsewhere. There is a light rain falling on and off, and there is a cold, slight breeze. Curiously, as soon as our Zodiac hits the beach, we are confronted by a VERY large, armed Canadian (non-native) mountie on a 4-wheeler. He wants to know who we are and why we are here. When John identifies himself, it seems to console his suspicions, but he still informs us of the “rules’ of our behavior while in the village: If we have any alcohol on us, it goes back to “Itasca” immediately; if we have weapons, they must leave as well; if we brought things to “trade,” forget it - the villagers are no longer allowing amazing carvings and personal craft to be “traded” for booze or “trinkets.” Then he turns to me and wants to know the purpose of my pictures. I explain I have done much work in villages in Alaska and have published that material, but I have never been in an Arctic village, which I am sure is quite different, and I would simply like to make images that are good documents. I have no intent to make anybody look impoverished, starving, drunk, or otherwise. I just want to create pictures of what the village looks like to those that see it everyday. He comments that there is not much to see, but as long as I don’t have “some agenda,” I am free to go where I want and take pictures of whatever I choose. SO, we are off ! Aloha, Gjoa Haven !
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
____________________________________________________

Tuesday, August 22, 2017

Weekly Post: THE TONGASS: Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees by Robert Glenn Ketchum

THE TONGASS:  Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees
by Robert Glenn Ketchum
In 1985, I began a 2-year commission to explore the Tongass rainforest, the largest forest in the United States Forest Service (USFS) system AND the largest temperate rainforest in the world. It was a unique, old-growth environment under siege from industrial logging. The resulting investigative book I published helped to pass the Tongass Timber Reform Bill, protect 1,000,000 acres of old-growth, and create 11 new wilderness areas. This is the story of how that was achieved.





Tuesday, August 22, 2017

THE TONGASS:  Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees, #52:
THE TONGASS, #52: In a really deep fjord, it may not be simple to anchor, so “Observer” motors to the very end of Gut Bay, where there is a waterfall of some considerable volume that has deposited enough silt to form an underwater delta at the head of the gorge. The silt bottom provides a place to anchor, but the trick is placement of the boat. If you get in too close, you might end up in the mud at low tide. I am still getting used to the idea that the tide rises and falls about 15ft., twice a day, and in a fjord, that tidal shift is a very unusual thing. Until this journey, I have never seen seaweed and starfish on vertical walls that are ABOVE MY HEAD. This image is high tide, and you can see that the water has risen to the very base of the trees. At low tide, those trees will be UP on a wall of rock that is covered with what looks like the growth of tidal pools. Viewing rich sea life in this way from a kayak, and watching starfish crawl across vertical walls WELL above you is a strange experience, and as I would soon learn, one that I will have again and again in my journeys throughout the Tongass.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
____________________________________________________

Weekly Post: NO PEBBLE MINE: Pictures from Ground Zero by Robert Glenn Ketchum

NO PEBBLE MINE Pictures from Ground Zero 
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Thank you to the EPA for recognizing the value of the Bristol Bay fishery. 
NOW, what can we do to protect this habitat further? 
Mission: To protect the national parks and national refuges of southwest Alaska, 
and the Bristol Bay fishery from the development of the Pebble mine, and other commercial risks.




Tuesday, August 22, 2017 

NO PEBBLE MINE #258, Pictures from Ground Zero:  
NO PEBBLE MINE #258: I feel relatively warm, except for my fingers which are victims of me having to take most of my gloves off (I have several layers) in order to change film. (Ever load a 645 with cold, brittle film ? - LOL). As we retreat from the peaks and valleys of the backcountry, the weather is increasing, and our visibility is decreasing. As a skier, I have experienced white-outs, a condition where the light is so flat that you cannot see the terrain, so I asks my pilot if that can happen in an airplane. As I feared, his answer is yes, but he assures me that if it looks like that was what was happening, we would just land. When I ask where, he just laughs and says, “pretty much anywhere we want.” Needless to say, I now hope that we will not have to do that. Aside from my apprehensions about the dangers of the weather surrounding us, the strange half-light makes passing walls ghostly dramatic. The pilot and I talk constantly while I shoot, and at this moment (above) I am expressing what an amazing POV I have for the shot, to which he notes I should wait until I take the snowmobile out, and then come here to see what these same walls look like from below. Me on a snowmobile, HERE ! He assures me it is possible.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd @NRDC @OrvisFlyFishing #NoPebbleMine #LittleBearProd


Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism Online:



_____________________________________________________

Monday, August 21, 2017

Weekly Post: The Higher You Get, The Higher You Get by Robert Glenn Ketchum

by Robert Glenn Ketchum


Growing up my parents had a home near Sun Valley, Idaho. It was there that I learned to ski. Over many years I befriended members of the Decker Flats Climbing and Frisbee Club, with whom I had both life, and art-forming outdoor experiences. I had my camera, and these are my adventures.




Monday, August 21, 2017

The Higher You Get, The Higher You Get - Sun Valley and the DFC&FC, #68:
THE HIGHER YOU GET, THE HIGHER YOU GET, #68:  Sitting in Pioneer Cabin having dinner after our walk-about in the alpine basins below us that afternoon, two ideas filter into our conversations. One is that I am going to try to get Sun Valley Magazine to run a short article about our campsite clean-up (post #66) as it will serve to promote the photography program I teach at the SVCAC, and it will further the “lore” of the DFC&FC which will help to fill our evening lectures that we give at the Sun Valley Lodge. The other topic of our conversation is the condition of the cabin. The stove barely works and leaks smoke; many of the windows are broken out so it is hard to keep out the cold out and keep in the warmth; the beds are a joke, as springs have rusted away; and because it has rained much of our visit, there are pots EVERYWHERE trying to contain dripping from the porous roof. Inspired by our effort earlier in the day to clean up the filthy sheep camp, I hatch an idea to save the cabin. I will ask Glenn Cooper, whom I work for at the art center, to speak with her friend, Bill Janss, who is developing Sun Valley. As winter approaches, I have noticed many “abandoned” materials lying around as construction sites close down for the season, and I want Sun Valley Company to “donate” nails, glass, scrap board, and rolls of tarpaper to the DFC&FC, so that we may rebuild the cabin. Then, I will do a story about THAT for Sun Valley Magazine. Further, I can see it can become a two-part DFC&FC adventure, if we can start the inside-the-cabin work in the winter, and mix that with a bit of backcountry skiing. Then, we can come back to finish the outside and the roof, the following summer. Glenn Cooper and Bill Janss fully support the idea, and local helicopter pilot, Danny Danielson, offers to donate a couple of flights up to the cabin to carry in the supplies because he likes our initiative as well. The above shot becomes a cover of Sun Valley Magazine.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
____________________________________________________

Weekly Post: STONED IMMACULATE: A Trip in the Desert by Robert Glenn Ketchum

STONED IMMACULATE:  A Trip in the Desert
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

As a young photographer, two places I “discovered” by chance greatly influenced both my photographic vision and my personal relationship with the greater planet. A previous blog, LIMEKILN, is the story of the first location. THIS is the second location which I discovered because my car broke down. As Jim Morrison/The Doors wrote, “Out here we is stoned Immaculate!"








Monday, August 21, 2017

Stoned Immaculate, #42:
Immaculate, #42: In the mid-70’s, the prints I am making are doing well in the market, but I would really like to make them MUCH larger, so I keep hoping I will see some kind of change in technology that will make that happen. In the meantime, I graduate with an MFA from CalArts; I begin working as a curator on the board of the formative Los Angeles Center for Photographic Studies: and, I meet a very beautiful Hollywood production assistant named Vicki Golden. Vicki works from project-to-project by choice, which means that she can take time off and travel. It also means that she can choose to work other jobs and still return to doing film crew coordination when good opportunities arise. She and I become partners for most of the next decade, and Vicki travels everywhere that I do, very capably joining in my many adventures. When we ARE back in LA after one of our trips, instead of seeking work in film, she thinks it would be a good idea for both of us if she goes to work for the new G. Ray Hawkins Gallery that has just opened on Melrose Avenue and is ONLY exhibiting photography.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
____________________________________________________

Thursday, July 27, 2017

Saturday, July 22, 2017

Orvis Supports No Pebble Mine

icon icon