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Monday, February 19, 2018

Weekly Post: STONED IMMACULATE: A Trip in the Desert by Robert Glenn Ketchum

STONED IMMACULATE:  A Trip in the Desert
by Robert Glenn Ketchum


As a young photographer, two places I “discovered” by chance greatly influenced both my photographic vision and my personal relationship with the greater planet. A previous blog, LIMEKILN, is the story of the first location. THIS is the second location which I discovered because my car broke down. As Jim Morrison/The Doors wrote, “Out here we is stoned Immaculate!"




Monday, February 19, 2018
“Chicxulub Shockwave K-Pg"
circa 1985-1995

Stoned Immaculate, #68:
Immaculate, #68:  from the portfolio, STONED IMMACULATE

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2018, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism Online:
SOCIAL MEDIA by @LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Friday, February 16, 2018

Weekly Post: The Daze of My Life: Robert Glenn Ketchum, An Autobiography


Biographies are studies of someone's life based on cumulative research. Good ones may reveal something, but probably barely scratch the surface of what actually went on. The internet is allowing me to do something VERY different. 
~Robert Glenn Ketchum


Friday, February 16, 2018

The Daze of My Life:  Robert Glenn Ketchum, An Autobiography #85:
Daze, #85: The home in Three Rivers offered to me by my clients, is situated on a boulder-strewn shoreline of the east fork of the Kaweah River, as it tumbles out of the steepening canyons and snowpack above it in Sequoia-Kings Canyon National Park. Three Rivers is a destination unto itself, but for my friends and I, it is a launching pad for a whole host of activities. Shortly after passing through Three Rivers, you enter the park and the road begins to climb. For awhile, the drive offers views of the river valley dropping ever farther below, but then it turns steeply upward, into a LONG series of switchbacks that is probably one of the most twisting and changing drives in all of North America. At the start, Three Rivers and the Kaweah might have offered sunshine or rain on meadows of wildflowers surrounded by oak and sycamore woodlands. Up the road apiece, part way through the switchbacks, those meadows and oaks are now plunging down the steep walls below the rising road, and the drive enters evergreen forest. It may also mark the start of the snowline. Not much farther along, the evergreens give way to the sequoia forest and unimaginably large trees speckle the terrain. This is like NO OTHER forest in the world. These are the oldest living things on earth! A visit to Three Rivers offers all of these remarkable environments to explore.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2018 
@RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

SOCIAL MEDIA by @LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Thursday, February 15, 2018

Weekly Post, High and Wild: Three Years of Wandering in the Wind Rivers

High and Wild: Three Years of Wandering in the Wind Rivers
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

After receiving my MFA from CalArts, I was invited by Bill Lund, Sharon Disney’s husband, to come stay at the families' Diamond-D Ranch in Dubois, Wyoming. Bill thought I might like to photograph in the nearby Wind River Mountains, which I did, backpacking through them extensively over the next three summers. Welcome to a world of big granite walls and huge alpine lakes!







Thursday, February 15, 2018

High and Wild:  Three Years of Wandering in the Wind Rivers, #25:
Wind River, #25:  Looking INTO the Wind River range from atop our granite dome perch at the shore of Clear Lake is a very different view. The forested slopes have become fewer and further between, and the granite has emerged. Huge domes, spires, and glaciated faces are visible, well ABOVE our position at this point. I expect to see other lakes in this vista, as they were represented on the crude trail map carving, which also indicated they were larger than Clear Lake, but nothing is visible. Perhaps they are down in those trees at the end of the canyon. Clear Lake surprised us when we came upon it so suddenly, so who knows. On our dome, we are well above the lake and trail, and there is no one, nor any camps to be seen, and it is HOT. We shed clothes and break out lunch snacks, sunning ourselves for awhile. I bore easily, however, and remain curious about the rest of the lake, and the others I cannot not see, so I suggest we continue on the trail. Chris and Cathy want to laze-around more, though, and Chris brought his inflatable boat, and wants to go fishing. Sounds good, but not my style, thus dog (Belle Star) and I are planning a different adventure for our day.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2018, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism Online:
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Weekly Post: Big Mountain and Glacier National Park - Expanding My Winter Consciousness

Big Mountain and Glacier National Park - 
Expanding My Winter Consciousness
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

In the early '70’s, I was doing a lot of winter adventuring with my friends in the Decker Flats Climbing and Frisbee Club, and a client invited me to take pictures at Big Mountain, a ski resort in Montana. Glacier National Park was not far away, so I thought that might be an interesting place to explore in the winter, as well. These two locations added important work to my exhibits and portfolios, and definitely expanded/sobered my winter consciousness.




Thursday, February 15, 2018

Big Mountain and Glacier National Park - Expanding My Winter Consciousness, #29:
Big Mountain, #29: With the weather constantly changing, but relatively good, there is such a great skyshow as a backdrop to these tree forms, I try not to give up my view. Rather than drop down into the fog shrouded bowl below me, I opt to continue traversing a line below the ridge, and above the fog, The tree density in my route is minimal, giving me some safe lines to ski and offering various sculptural clusters that are now starting to assume “character” because my physical activity has completed digestion of my lunch and snacks. I am warm, really comfortable in my skis, my cameras are all still working, and these guys appear on the ridge above me, dancing! Actually, I think one s trying to cut in one the other. Perhaps I should just keep moving.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2018, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism Online:
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Weekly Post: Adventuring on the Yakutat Forelands - Bowing before St. Elias by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Adventuring on the Yakutat Forelands - Bowing before St. Elias
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

The Yakutat Forelands are where the Tongass rainforest and the Chugach forest to the north meet. It is also home to many large glaciers, a stunning coastline, the huge Alsek-Tatshenshini river, and Icy Bay, which sits at the foot of Mount St. Elias, the greatest vertical rise from sea level in the world. There is a lot of powerful energy out here.





Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Adventuring on the Yakutat Forelands - Bowing before St. Elias, #58:
The Yakutat Forelands, #58:  At some point in our beach walk, there is finally a point where the steep mud-gravel walls become surmountable, and offer us the opportunity to begin an ascent through rolling hills. It is strange and surprising terrain. It consists of very hard packed gravel and stones, anchored here and there by huge patches of moss and clusters of fireweed. As it rains on and off now, streams and modest waterfalls flow everywhere, but the rambling around is relatively easy and we continue to climb. We can likely summit some of these “mountains” around us, but our guide wants us to see something more enlightening. He is taking us to a place where we can see what is atop these HILLS. Were we to attempt a “summit,” we would be VERY surprised.
photograph(s) © copyright, Robert Glenn Ketchum, 2018, @RbtGlennKetchum, @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Weekly Post, ARCTIC: At the Cutting Edge of Climate Change

ARCTIC:  At the Cutting Edge of Climate Change
by Robert Glenn Ketchum



In 1993, I began traveling to the Arctic. I have been across The Northwest Passage by yacht; to the North Pole twice; to little-visited Russian islands; and aboard research vessels in Greenland, Labrador, Newfoundland, and Baffin Island, taking the opportunity to visit Iqualuit, the capital of Nunavut, the recently created Inuit nation and territories.





Wednesday, February 14, 2018


ARCTIC:  At the Cutting Edge of Climate Change, #79:
ARCTIC, #79:  Surrounded by shallow water, rebound islands, and various encounters with larger, more dense patches of ice, our navigation north is slow. With not much else to do, John Bockstoce and I, go flying. I suggest to Bill that having me, plenty of fuel, and a helicopter aboard, would be wasted if I did NOT take advantage of it, to which he generously agrees. The pilot and I now “get” each other as well, so it is fun to work with him because he understands what I am shooting, and navigates to help me. One especially clear and windy day, we are getting close to Cape Victoria, so John and I fly to see what “lies beyond.” We cut across the tip of the cape to save some flight time, and as we emerge on the far shore, we once again encounter a terrain of rebound islands, shallows, and deeper, darker blue waters as we progress north. In earlier posts #66-#70, I mused about perceiving the ice as clouds and the islands like the Caribbean. On this day, I feel I have a view of the world from the space station. Below me are countries and bodies of vast water. My mind spins, and my shutter clicks away.

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2018, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Tuesday, February 13, 2018

Weekly Post: THE TONGASS: Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees by Robert Glenn Ketchum

THE TONGASS:  Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees
by Robert Glenn Ketchum
In 1985, I began a 2-year commission to explore the Tongass rainforest, the largest forest in the United States Forest Service (USFS) system AND the largest temperate rainforest in the world. It was a unique, old-growth environment under siege from industrial logging. The resulting investigative book I published helped to pass the Tongass Timber Reform Bill, protect 1,000,000 acres of old-growth, and create 11 new wilderness areas. This is the story of how that was achieved.




Tuesday, February 13, 2018

THE TONGASS:  Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees, #77:
THE TONGASS, #77:  I disembark “Observer” in Ketchikan, find a room in an historically designated waterfront hotel above a saloon, and pick my friend, Philip Slagter, up at the airport. We have also shipped up all of the gear we might need to camp without guide service, and we are here in Ketchikan to accomplish several tasks. We will meet Dale Pihlman, a local fisherman and tour guide, who has offered to ferry us into a camping cabin in Misty Fjords National Monument. We also want to find a pilot to flight-see the same. Dale will meet us for dinner, so Philip and I walk to waterfront, as it serves MANY purposes. There is a lot of industrial dockage, as you saw in posts #75 & #76, and many private boats. Laced amongst them, however, are air service docks for private float plane operators, and we are in search of one of them. In our wandering, regardless of whatever transitions are now occurring in Ketchikan, the presence of fishing and the canneries is everywhere around us.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2018, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Thursday, September 21, 2017

H.R. 232, 115th Congress, 1st Session

"A CALL TO ACTION: 115th Congressional Assault on The Tongass National Forest", The Boat Company

A CALL TO ACTION: 115th Congressional Assault on The Tongass National Forest

Reprinted with permission from Hunter H. McIntosh, President, The Boat Company

We are living in a time of unprecedented attacks on both public lands and waters, and the agencies that protect them. Without action on the part of all Americans, Republican and Democrat, we stand to lose much of the conservation legacy that has been achieved over the 38 years since The Boat Company was created, not just in Southeast Alaska, but everywhere. And it is no coincidence that this legislation is all coming out rapid fire – the flood of new legislation, not seen in six years, is designed to make it more difficult to meaningfully respond to or organize around any one proposed law.

Monday, September 18, 2017

A Tale of Two Futures: Alaskan Wild Salmon vs. the Pebble Mine by Joel Reynolds, NRDC

A Tale of Two Futures: Alaskan Wild Salmon vs. the Pebble Mine

by Joel Reynolds, Western Director, Senior Attorney, Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC)
Reprinted with permission by the Author.
Originally published on Huffington Post.

For anyone still unclear about the irreconcilable disconnect between the rich heritage of Alaskans and the overriding financial self-interest of The Pebble Partnership, it was on stunning display in Bristol Bay’s wild salmon fishery this summer.

Wednesday, September 13, 2017

"A CALL TO ACTION: 115th Congressional Assault on The Tongass National Forest", The Boat Company

A CALL TO ACTION: 115th Congressional Assault on The Tongass National Forest

Reprinted with permission from Hunter H. McIntosh, President, The Boat Company

We are living in a time of unprecedented attacks on both public lands and waters, and the agencies that protect them. Without action on the part of all Americans, Republican and Democrat, we stand to lose much of the conservation legacy that has been achieved over the 38 years since The Boat Company was created, not just in Southeast Alaska, but everywhere. And it is no coincidence that this legislation is all coming out rapid fire – the flood of new legislation, not seen in six years, is designed to make it more difficult to meaningfully respond to or organize around any one proposed law.

Wednesday, September 6, 2017

"A CALL TO ACTION: 115th Congressional Assault on The Tongass National Forest", The Boat Company

A CALL TO ACTION: 115th Congressional Assault on The Tongass National Forest

Reprinted with permission from Hunter H. McIntosh, President, The Boat Company

We are living in a time of unprecedented attacks on both public lands and waters, and the agencies that protect them. Without action on the part of all Americans, Republican and Democrat, we stand to lose much of the conservation legacy that has been achieved over the 38 years since The Boat Company was created, not just in Southeast Alaska, but everywhere. And it is no coincidence that this legislation is all coming out rapid fire – the flood of new legislation, not seen in six years, is designed to make it more difficult to meaningfully respond to or organize around any one proposed law.

"Focus On What Matters Most" by Hunter H. McIntosh

"Focus On What Matters Most" by Hunter H. McIntosh 


Reprinted with permission from Hunter H. McIntosh, President, The Boat Company

With the transition of power now over, and the process of seating a new Presidential cabinet under way at the time I write this, we all watch the news with bated breath in anticipation of who will be the next Secretary of this, or Ambassador of that. At the end of the day, with so much fear gripping our nation, the reality is that we are a country of checks and balances.

As a small business focused on nature-based tourism in Southeast Alaska, as well as the protection and preservation of the Tongass National Forest, like many we have our concerns. Conservation has always been at the heart of our mission, and we are passionate about taking action to protect this amazing area we cruise throughout each year. However, we also are dedicated to providing our guests with the best wilderness experience that Alaska has to offer. And so, in this issue, we share with you some current events about our government and the Tongass, in the hopes we might inspire you to help us in our land protection efforts. And as always, we share some personal stories, company updates and compelling photographs to hold you over until we see you again {hopefully sooner than later!}

Friday, August 25, 2017

Weekly Post: My Life in the Garden of Eden by Robert Glenn Ketchum

My Life in the Garden of Eden
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

As part of paying the bills in my professional career, I photographed a number of significant gardens. I helped create several pretty amazing ones as well. Some of these pictures have been published in various books, but most have never been seen. In this blog, I will show you all my best garden images AND discuss garden design.




Friday, August 25, 2017
My Life in the Garden of Eden, #60:
Garden, #60: At the end of the work cycle, and VERY MUCH in the “contributing to the diversity and well being of the universe” mode I suggest in the last post, with the invading dune grass removed, not ALL things call out to be smothered with chip. I would always rather have an opulent garden with a small path, than a small garden and a chip freeway. So, here is the beginning of the newest addition to my garden design, an emerging garden “island” to which I can strictly control and direct watering. It may look spare now, but later this fall I will repost as the plantings mature and the COLORS begin to take over the show. This took an amazing amount of soil to create. Behind the new island (foreground), to the right, you can see the “finished” product - a lush, and fully “landscaped” water-zone with a thriving banana tree. To the left in the background is the island I am presently ridding of grasses (shown in last post). By the end of the year, my paths should wind through a very eccentric, but beautifully transformed backyard, so I hope you will continue to follow my progress and stay with this blog. Remember, SUCK YO LENT!
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Orvis Supports No Pebble Mine

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