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Saturday, April 22, 2017

Venice Art Walk 2017

“Peaking in My Butterfly Garden” 2017*


Once again it is time for the Venice ARTwalk, one of the truly fun all-weekend parties in Los Angeles. Come see great art displayed at the Google headquarters and buy something at the auction to support the Venice Family Clinic. I always create a UNIQUE piece for this event, so please join us and bid on it. At 30” wide, my contribution this year: “Peaking in My Butterfly Garden”
For more info:
https://theveniceartwalk.org



Venice Art Walk 2017

May 21, 2017
12pm-6pm
340 Main Street
Venice, California


*photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com

Friday, April 21, 2017

Weekly Post: My Life in the Garden of Eden by Robert Glenn Ketchum

My Life in the Garden of Eden
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

As part of paying the bills in my professional career, I photographed a number of significant gardens. I helped create several pretty amazing ones as well. Some of these pictures have been published in various books, but most have never been seen. In this blog, I will show you all my best garden images AND discuss garden design.




Friday, April 21, 2017
My Life in the Garden of Eden, #42:
Garden, #42:  This is the more finished part of my new garden, and the spring rains have brought the islands of planting alive. As you see, I have mixed pots and ground plantings in clusters that allow viewing and access from 360-degrees. This post, however, is really about the plant blooming those lavender, cone-shaped flowers in the upper left - a Pride of Madeira. This is a beautiful flowering plant as you can see. It is also drought tolerant. In California, it is considered an invasive species in the wild. In my garden it will just try to take over. MORE importantly, there are few other plants I know that attract bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds like this one does. It brings the entire garden to life. Things are literally, buzzing! If you are a insect biologist and reading this, perhaps you can help me here. One other element is attracted to this plant, and I can only describe it as a “crazy moth.” It is seldom around during the day, and if they are here at night I do not see them, but for about 3hrs. every morning, several of them arrive in the yard. They do not often land, but rather fly around VERY fast in crazy patterns that seem to have little meaning. Occasionally they chase each, but mostly they just rocket around nearly missing things, and they are as fast as hummingbirds. I think they are moths because I saw one dive into a planter, and when I investigated it looked moth-like with camouflage wing colors. Any ideas?
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Weekly Post: The Daze of My Life: Robert Glenn Ketchum, An Autobiography


Biographies are studies of someone's life based on cumulative research. Good ones may reveal something, but probably barely scratch the surface of what actually went on. The internet is allowing me to do something VERY different. 
~Robert Glenn Ketchum



Friday, April 21, 2017

The Daze of My Life:  Robert Glenn Ketchum, An Autobiography #42:
Daze, #42:  After graduation from UCLA, I move to Sun Valley, Idaho to begin my career as a practicing photographer. During the first fall-winter, I live in the Bald Mountain Hot Springs Motel, teach photography classes out of my apartment and run the light show for the Boiler Room, a nightclub attached to the Lodge at Sun Valley. Through my photography classes, I am fortunate enough to meet prominent resident, Glenn Cooper, who is in the process of founding the Sun Valley Creative Arts Center, and she asks if I would like to teach a workshop under their auspices in the following summer. It sounds good to me, so I agree. I also ask if the teachers might have housing provided and so “friends” of the SVCAC help me find living accommodations, and I end up ensconced in a 4-bedroom duplex at the end of Warm Springs Road that is built into the hillside and looks directly at the Lower Warm Springs ski run. “Off” season I commute to Santa Barbara for classes at Brooks Institute and the picture in the previous post was a result of fulfilling an assignment for Brooks during a visit to the valley. Once summer starts, I return to Idaho, to teach workshops for the SVCAC. They are very popular AND full, so I am also able to employ other friends to teach additional classes. The rental house fills with 3 teachers and the owner’s son next door, then Gordon Williams and Chris Puchner, my colleagues from the Decker Flats Climbing and Frisbee Club, show up and start to hang around. Friends have friends, dogs, AND girlfriends, so it is quite a summer. Many pictures important to my emerging career are made. I learn to camp, backpack, and begin skiing backcountry, taking my camera to some VERY different parts of the landscape. Above you see: THE house from which we all hold court; the Chevy Camaro I pretend is really a 4-wheel drive vehicle; and Shelley Selover, my girlfriend at the time, is visiting from LA to enjoy hiking in the mountains (not quite sure what she thought of the somewhat looney household - LOL!)
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Wednesday, April 19, 2017

Weekly Post: Adventuring on the Yakutat Forelands - Bowing before St. Elias by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Adventuring on the Yakutat Forelands - Bowing before St. Elias
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

The Yakutat Forelands are where the Tongass rainforest and the Chugach forest to the north meet. It is also home to many large glaciers, a stunning coastline, the huge Alsek-Tatshenshini river, and Icy Bay, which sits at the foot of Mount St. Elias, the greatest vertical rise from sea level in the world. There is a lot of powerful energy out here.




Wednesday, April 19, 2017

Adventuring on the Yakutat Forelands - Bowing before St. Elias, #15:
The Yakutat Forelands, #15:  Recalling our pilots parting advice about a small trail at the end of the dirt runway that might provide access to the goat meadows above the headlands, I tell Cary and Mark we should check it out before returning to the cabin, to which they agree. We do a few more small stream fords and some low stick-thrash, then relatively quickly we find ourselves on the dry, brushless strip that serves the precarious landing. We are a good distance from the cabin, and in minutes we reach “the end” of the strip. Visible, but only just barely so, there is clearly a trail in the brush, but it does no appear to have much use. We forge away and see that it runs parallel to the water flows we have engaged all morning, mostly passing through a stand of trees and scrub. At some point in the walk, we cross an invisible line in the forest that COMPLETELY changes our auditory intake. The sound of our footsteps give way to water noises which quickly grow louder, and then just some feet further along, clearly begin a kind of sonic echoing that we all hear in amazement. Mark is concerned we might have consumed to many snacks, but I am sure “it is all good” and continue to decipher the path. It comes to a gnarly rock wall that is covered with astounding lichen, but little vegetation, and there is clearly visible climbing access, so I start up. It is wet and slippery, but GLOWING, and the echoing of the waterfall changes pitch and rhythm as we change our position. At one point we round a small ledge, and look down on the source of our soundtrack. I think we ARE going to goat heaven!
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Weekly Post:, ARCTIC: At the Cutting Edge of Climate Change

ARCTIC:  At the Cutting Edge of Climate Change
by Robert Glenn Ketchum



In 1993, I began traveling to the Arctic. I have been across The Northwest Passage by yacht; to the North Pole twice; to little-visited Russian islands; and aboard research vessels in Greenland, Labrador, Newfoundland, and Baffin Island, taking the opportunity to visit Iqualuit, the capital of Nunavut, the recently created Inuit nation and territories.




Wednesday, April 19, 2017

ARCTIC:  At the Cutting Edge of Climate Change, #36:
ARCTIC, #36:  Bill’s guests have many questions: How long has her family been here? What goes on in daily village life? What happens in the winter? Does she live “subsistence”? Because where she lives is SO foreign to our group, everyone is fascinated to hear her speak about what she views as “normal” existence. Although I am listening to this, I leave the questioning to the other guests, and I circle the group taking pictures. As I come to the chair behind her where she has placed her parka, I finally look closely at it, and I am transfixed. As an adventurer, I am VERY particularly about my gear and clothing, and I recognize something that suggests both style and function (hence I have often mentioned my use of Patagonia gear), so as I studied this parka I began to realize the design subtleties of seam placement and choice of furs. I take several pictures of the parka with flash, which suddenly makes me more apparent in the room, and she turns to me to ask if I have any questions. “I know you made this,” I said glancing at the parka, “So please tell me about all of the details that go into it.” Her response is a thesis, the long and short of which is that there is NOTHING about this that has not been sorely design tested, and EVERYTHING chosen in the construction is VERY specific. There are cloth layers, layers of lining, careful attention to seams that might leak cold, AND three different animal skins to complete protection around the openings. I am particularly interested that the especially long hairs of certain martin pelts are used to surround the face, because the long hairs keep her face from getting vapor frosted. Really! Perfect! She also notes that this is her light, more fashionable parka, and that she has a very different one for winter life. Now you know why Patagonia catalogs have all of those technical explanations about their product function, it is part of the history of GREAT clothing makers.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Weekly Post: THE TONGASS: Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees by Robert Glenn Ketchum

THE TONGASS:  Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees
by Robert Glenn Ketchum
In 1985, I began a 2-year commission to explore the Tongass rainforest, the largest forest in the United States Forest Service (USFS) system AND the largest temperate rainforest in the world. It was a unique, old-growth environment under siege from industrial logging. The resulting investigative book I published helped to pass the Tongass Timber Reform Bill, protect 1,000,000 acres of old-growth, and create 11 new wilderness areas. This is the story of how that was achieved.




Tuesday, April 18, 2017

THE TONGASS:  Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees, #34:
THE TONGASS, #34:  Besides wanting to see the small community of Baranof Warm Springs, or to make use of their communal hot springs baths, another significant attraction of the bay is the spectacular waterfall that pours down from Baranof Lake. At the moment, salmon are pooling here, preparing for their attempt to ascend the falls and several boats are fishing them.To be polite, it seems each fisherman in turn motors into position and starts casting as the force of the falls pushes them away. As they drift out of the prime area, the next person motors in. I am a good distance away from the falls at this point using a modest telephoto lens, and I am still being struck by a cold, wet wind that covers my lens with spray in between shots. You need full rain gear to be fishing this location. Like all waterfalls, this one is hypnotic to watch and listen to, but as my gaze takes this all in, I realize the AMAZING amount of water that is pouring off of these mountainous islands EVERY SECOND, and feeding this intricate, old growth forest habitat.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Weekly Post: NO PEBBLE MINE: Pictures from Ground Zero by Robert Glenn Ketchum

NO PEBBLE MINE Pictures from Ground Zero 
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Thank you to the EPA for recognizing the value of the Bristol Bay fishery. 
NOW, what can we do to protect this habitat further? 
Mission: To protect the national parks and national refuges of southwest Alaska, 
and the Bristol Bay fishery from the development of the Pebble mine, and other commercial risks.




Tuesday, April 18, 2017 


NO PEBBLE MINE #240, Pictures from Ground Zero:  
NO PEBBLE MINE #240: Before we leave Wood-Tikchik State Park and transition over the Wood mountain range into Togiak National Wildlife Refuge, there are I few more aspects of the park my cooperation with the Tikchik Narrows Lodge revealed, that are essential to appreciating the ENTIRE Bristol Bay ecosystem. Part of that, is these mountains, for although they are not particularly high, they do stick up abruptly from a vast rolling tundra plain, AND they face directly into the North Pacific and the Bering Sea. They can accumulate a significant amount of snow in the winter, feeding the Bristol Bay watershed all summer, BUT in centuries past, there was SO much snow, these mountains were a source of many large glaciers (please read/re-reread post #213). Some glacial remnants still exist, and summits and valleys carved by glaciers abound, so before we leave this park, we are going to more intimately explore these mountains in ALL SEASONS! This imaginary flight combines A LOT of hours of flying time over terrain few ever see, I hope you will enjoy. Already familiar under our wing, the densely vegetated, more rounded foothills, provide relief for the distant, rugged summits, and as we get closer, you will be amazed at how much more rugged those summits are.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd @NRDC @OrvisFlyFishing #NoPebbleMine #LittleBearProd

Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism Online:
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Monday, April 17, 2017

Weekly Post: The Higher You Get, The Higher You Get by Robert Glenn Ketchum

by Robert Glenn Ketchum


Growing up my parents had a home near Sun Valley, Idaho. It was there that I learned to ski. Over many years I befriended members of the Decker Flats Climbing and Frisbee Club, with whom I had both life, and art-forming outdoor experiences. I had my camera, and these are my adventures.




Monday, April 17, 2017

The Higher You Get, The Higher You Get - Sun Valley and the DFC&FC, #50:
THE HIGHER YOU GET, THE HIGHER YOU GET, #50:  More of the characters involved. No! Not the girl! That is Shelley Selover, my girlfriend at the time, who has come up to Sun Valley from Los Angeles to do some hiking and camping. The “characters” I refer to are the house and the car. The car is my ’67 327 Chevy Camaro Rally Sport, that I imagine to be a 4-wheel drive vehicle, having taken it up the road to Hell Roaring Lake in the Sawtooths, TWICE! AS you can see, it is attractively decorated - it is amazing any air passes through that grille or you can even see my headlights - I think we have just come back from a camping trip to Kane Lake in the Pioneer mountains, and I believe I forged some creeks getting to the trailhead. THE HOUSE is something else entirely. Owned by a family in Oregon, this is a duplex located out near the end of Warm Springs road, looking directly across at lower Warm Springs run, and not far from the circular stone house. Split down the middle, each unit has 2 large bedrooms/bathrooms, a kitchen, a living room with huge fireplace, and balcony access upstairs, while downstairs are 2 smaller bedrooms, a bathroom, and door access. Because I was teaching at the Sun Valley Creative Arts Center, climber-realtor-property manager, Louis Stur, a friend of several DFC&FC members and anyone else who loved the surrounding mountains, arranged a rental for “us” on one side of this unit, and the owner sent his son out to live on the other side and “supervise” us. There were A LOT of “us.” Originally, we were all teachers - myself, Chris Korody (previous post), and our colleague from San Francisco, George Leisey. Then, Gordon Williams, Chris Puchner, and Pasha (a dog friend of GW and my dog, Belle Star - see post #46) started hanging around, initiating the pioneering of climbing routes across the huge stone fireplace in the living room. When we took the owner’s son with us on a backpack to Decker Lake and the Finger-of-Fate (posts #38-48), he opened up his side of the duplex to our group and joined our party. We stored all our climbing and camping gear in HIS downstairs bedrooms, so that we could be ready to go at a moment’s notice. (Shelley went on to be a publicist for Arnold Schwarzenegger, on tour doing media with The Rolling Stones, a 17-year Vice President of West Coast Media for Sony Music, and now owns CIA Media, managing Stevie Wonder. She is amazing person with whom I shared some very good times. TY, SS!)! 
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Orvis Supports No Pebble Mine

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