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Friday, February 27, 2015

Weekly Post: CHINA Travels Since 1985 by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Traveling in CHINA Since 1985 by Robert Glenn Ketchum

During the reign of Mao (1949-1976), China was a closed country. China in the 1980’s was 80% rural, with no outside visitors, particularly from the West. When China opened to travelers, the Chinese government placed severe limitations on who was allowed to enter the country. Earthwatch was one organization that allowed foreigners to visit China without going through too much red-tape. These photographs are a first glimpse into China in the mid-1980’s by world-renowned Conservation Photographer Robert Glenn Ketchum. 


Friday, February 27, 2015

Traveling in China Since 1985, #120
CHINA #120:   Look carefully again at my last post:  the red lines indicate a super-highway system that is now in place. In 1986, NOT ONE of those highways existed! In fact, in 1989 it was estimated #China only had 170 miles of highway... and my first visits started in 1986!!! When I tell you in these #blogs growth was explosive and very rapid, consider that by 2003 China used half the concrete in the entire world and created 18,500 miles of new highway. For the time being, however, I was on my way to the #Dongshan peninsula of #LakeTaihu with my hosts, and we werw picking our way through a labyrinth of dirt country roads that navigated around canals, rice ponds, and fish farms. As you can see, once outside the city of #Suzhou, the countryside was VERY rural.  HOWEVER it was an amazing world, and again I was VERY aware of being a witness to “stepping-back-in-time.”
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2015, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #China @Earthwatch_org

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Weekly Post: SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient by Robert Glenn Ketchum

SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient by Robert Glenn Ketchum

During the reign of Mao (1949-1976), China was a closed country. China in the 1980’s was 80% rural, with no outside visitors, particularly from the West. When China opened to travelers, the Chinese government placed severe limitations on who was allowed to enter the country. These photographs are a continuation of other ongoing blog threads of the first glimpses into China in the mid-1980’s by world-renowned Conservation Photographer Robert Glenn Ketchum.


Friday, February 27, 2015


SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient, #53
SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient #53 - 1985 to the Present:  The #JinMao and #PearlTower are situated on a promontory of land overlooking the #HuangpuRiver and the #Bund. I say “promontory” because they are situated on a sharp bend in the river that wraps significantly “around” the towers and their neighboring buildings. As a consequence, the views up-and-down river are sweeping, and give the viewer a MUCH greater sense of the sprawl of #Shanghai, a city now thought to be home to about 24-MILLION people! This is downriver, and the Shanghai industrial shipyards (previous post #21) would be at shoreline near the bottom left, hidden at this point by the surrounding office towers.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2015, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #China #Shanghai

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Thursday, February 26, 2015

Weekly Post: SUZHOU, 1985-to the present by RobertGlennKetchum

Welcome to Suzhou, 1985 - to the present by Robert Glenn Ketchum

During the reign of Mao (1949-1976), China was a closed country. China in the 1980’s was 80% rural, with no outside visitors, particularly from the West. When China opened to travelers, the Chinese government placed severe limitations on who was allowed to enter the country. These photographs are a continuation of other ongoing blog threads of the first glimpses into China in the mid-1980’s by world-renowned Conservation Photographer 
Robert Glenn Ketchum.




Thursday, February 26, 2015

Welcome to Suzhou, 1985 - to the present, #54
Suzhou #54:   Aperture Foundation (@ApertureFdn) intended this to be a MAJOR #exhibit; not only some 300+ images displayed, but also prestigious national and international institutions to be displayed in. The book release and exhibit opening were timed to coincide with the 50-year “anniversary" of the establishing of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC), with the first venue being the Asia Society (@AsiaSocietyNY) in New York on October 7, 1999. The show blew-up with great reviews and large attendance, which set the stage for ever-increasing audiences as the exhibit toured North America. The other venues included:  the Royal Ontario Museum, Canada (@ROMToronto); the Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, California (@BAMPFA); the Chinese Cultural Centre Museum and Archives, Vancouver, BC (@CCCVan); the Minneapolis Institute of the Arts (@ArtsMia); the Lowe Art Museum, at the University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida (@LoweArtMuseum); the Freer and Sackler Galleries, the Smithsonian's museums of Asian Art, Washington, DC (@FreerSackler). With the North American tour ongoing and growing, the international demand for the exhibit caused Aperture to create an entire second exhibit set. EVEN CHINA INTENDED TO PUT THE EXHIBITION ON DISPLAY!
ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2015, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #China #Suzhou

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Weekly Post: SILK ROAD - Embroideries of Robert Glenn Ketchum

Silk Road - Embroideries of Robert Glenn Ketchum

The city of Suzhou, China, produced China's most beautiful silk and silk embroidery practiced by generational families for 3,000 years. My purpose in going to China starting in the mid-1980's was to turn my photographs into textiles, and this is my story. ~Robert Glenn Ketchum




Thursday, February 26, 2015


Silk Road - Embroideries #110
SILK ROAD #110:   The most "dense" #embroidery work on this piece was done in the trees. While there are many #stitches throughout this entire image, most of those stitches are spaced farther apart, allowing for the #diaphanous effect of the 2-sided design to be maximized. The trees on the other hand, were tightly rendered, not in massive layers like the previous posts of “Trees and Branches in Heavy Snow,” but by placing each #stitch as close to one another as could be #sewn. This kind of tight stitching was essential to capture the ever-finer complex of branches as they grow out from the trunk. The other beautiful and clever stitching here is the transition of the black branch stitching to the silver, blue, and white threads that were used to render their frosted coating.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2015, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #Embroidery @WesCFA @RSSDesigns
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Wednesday, February 25, 2015

Weekly Post: TATSHESHINI: Saving a River Wild

TATSHENSHINI:  Saving a River Wild by Robert Glenn Ketchum

In 1990, I was invited on a 10-day float down the Tatshenshini, a huge river system flowing from Western Canada to the Pacific Ocean that literally divides two of North America's largest national parks, Canada's Kluane National Park and Alaska's Glacier Bay National Park. A gold mine was being proposed mid-river. I broke the story in LIFE magazine. There were many other articles and a book. The mine was never developed and the river is now a wilderness corridor. This is a conservation SUCCESS story!


Wednesday, February 25, 2015

TATSHENSHINI:  Saving a River Wild, #38
TATSHENSHINI:  Saving a River Wild, #38:   Before all #light was lost, I wanted one last look “into-the-future” downriver, so I walked away from the buzz of dinner prep and “cocktails” and wandered down to the edge of the Tat. In the morning our float would swing briefly to the right, around the dark promontory, and then take a sweeping turn to the left directly under the peaks of the coastal #mountains, which are looking pretty dramatic this evening. After such an amazing, sunny day, would our luck continue tomorrow, or would we wake to find ourselves immersed once again weather from the #Gulf?
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2015, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #Tatshenshini @glacierbaynps @Life @Wilderness #WeAreTheWild @nature_AK

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Weekly Post: NO PEBBLE MINE: Pictures from Ground Zero by RobertGlennKetchum

NO PEBBLE MINE Pictures from Ground Zero 
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Thank you to the EPA for recognizing the value of the Bristol Bay fishery. 
NOW, what can we do to protect this habitat further? 
Mission: To protect the national parks and national refuges of southwest Alaska, 
and the Bristol Bay fishery from the development of the Pebble mine, and other commercial risks.



Wednesday, February 25, 2015 

NO PEBBLE MINE #128, Pictures from Ground Zero:
NO PEBBLE MINE #128, Pictures from Ground Zero:  The plane has dropped us (and our substantial gear) on a shore of #TwinLakes, near the outlet of the #ChilikadrotnaRiver, and departed. We are just standing around at the moment, trying to take it all in: and there is a lot of ALL to take in. Collectively we do agree that it looks like a change in the weather, so we start setting up camp in the protection of some stunted spruce trees.  In the course of the next few passing hours, I discover a unique quality in this lake. While it is true the #glacially fed waters generally appear a striking pale blue -- the color you might perceive a lake to be -- its color could change repeatedly and significantly as clouds, sunlight, and wind sweep across the #landscape. These changes will become very apparent in following #pictures. If the #cinder slope #foothills in the background look familiar, they are the same as those in the upper center-right of post #126.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2015, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd @NRDC @OrvisFlyFishing #NoPebbleMine #LittleBearProd

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Tuesday, February 24, 2015

Weekly Post: TRACY ARM WILDERNESS - An Alaskan Kayak "Trip" Through Time by Robert Glenn Ketchum

TRACY ARM WILDERNESS - An Alaskan Kayak "Trip" Through Time by Robert Glenn Ketchum

To celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the Wilderness Act (#Wilderness), this new blog focuses on a wilderness area in the #Tongass rainforest of southeast Alaska. This is the tale of a 10-day kayak trip - a testament to WHY wilderness is important, by world-renowned Conservation Photographer Robert Glenn Ketchum.





Tuesday, February 24, 2015


TRACY ARM Wilderness - An Alaskan Kayak "Trip" Through Time, #27
TRACY ARM Wilderness - An Alaskan Kayak "Trip" Through Time, #27:  Back in the boats, we were finally a bit more comfortable. And we were sure sometime relatively soon we would happen upon “Black Bear Beach,” our intended camp for the night. In the interim, the clouds lowered once again, however it didn't rain. Our continuing paddle brought us back into our heightened state of reality, and when we floated up to this berg, I was feeling particularly “heightened.” You could not dream this stuff up:  how is this for a luminous blue? The sculptor did a pretty nice job as well!. This little puppy (actually it was quite large) ate up a bit of our time as we could not resist paddling around and around it, watching the light change its coloration, and listening to the hiss and pop of its ongoing meltdown.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2015, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd @Wilderness #Wilderness #Tongass

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Monday, February 23, 2015

Weekly Post: THE HUDSON RIVER AND THE HIGHLANDS by Robert Glenn Ketchum

by Robert Glenn Ketchum


This is the story of my first major commission and book, THE HUDSON RIVER AND THE HIGHLANDS (Aperture, 1985). In 1984, #StephenShore, #WilliamClift, and I received a 2-year commission from the Lila Acheson Wallace Fund to photograph the #HudsonRiverValley. This blog tells the tale of the book, with many photos not seen before. Enjoy!



Monday, February 23, 2015

THE HUDSON RIVER AND THE HIGHLANDS #125:
HUDSON RIVER #125:   For all I have said about beautiful homes and big estates, the greater #HudsonRiverValley is quite rural. Many people have horses and raise stock.  Consequently they also have pastures they hay to provide feed for their animals. Hudson valley residents have VERY specific opinions, as well, and act on them politically. Among many property owners there is the intention to keep their roads “historically” dirt; they do NOT want them to be paved. Clearly this also adds to the rural “feeling” of the landscape. Here is some nice, late afternoon Hudson river light on one such “country” road... ”take me home.”
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2015, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd @Wallacefdn @Aperturefnd @PentaxOnline
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Tuesday, January 27, 2015

National Wilderness Conference

The other recent event celebrating the 50th Anniversary of The Wilderness Act I participated in was National Wilderness Conference in Albuquerque, NM. Organized by all of the collective federal agencies that manage wilderness lands, this was a multi-day event featuring numerous presentations and distinguished speakers such as Interior Secretary Sally Jewell, author Terry Tempest Williams, and Senator Tom Udall. I was asked to be an "inspirational" closing keynote speaker, along with my old friend, Dave Foreman, author of Ecodefense: A Field Guide to Monkeywrenching, and co-founder of Earth First!, the New Mexico Wilderness Alliance and  most recently, the Rewilding Institute

Dave Foreman, EcoWarrior, and Robert Glenn Ketchum, Conservation Photographer
Dave Foreman, Environmentalist, and Robert Glenn Ketchum, Conservation Photographer, 2014

Orvis Supports No Pebble Mine

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