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Monday, September 24, 2018

Weekly Post, High and Wild: Three Years of Wandering in the Wind Rivers

High and Wild: Three Years of Wandering in the Wind Rivers
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

After receiving my MFA from CalArts, I was invited by Bill Lund, Sharon Disney’s husband, to come stay at the families' Diamond-D Ranch in Dubois, Wyoming. Bill thought I might like to photograph in the nearby Wind River Mountains, which I did, backpacking through them extensively over the next three summers. Welcome to a world of big granite walls and huge alpine lakes!




Monday, September 24, 2018

High and Wild:  Three Years of Wandering in the Wind Rivers, #57:
Wind River, #57:  When Belle and I awake the next morning at our camp at Cook Lake, the day looks like it is going to be clear and hot. That is good for the hike we must do, because we have A LOT of work ahead of us. From Cook Lake, we must go up and over Lester Pass (11,060ft.), descending to Seneca Lake, and then we must go back up into the basin that holds Island Lake, because that is where my friends Chris and Cathy are camped, and they expect to see us tonight based on our plans. Having a crystal clear morning means I do not have to be worried about being stormed upon in a high pass, but unfortunately, it is going to be HOT! Recognizing this, we eat quickly, break camp, shoulder our packs, and head up the trail. UP is the word! Belle and I have about 2,000ft of trail climb to reach the summit, and every 1/2-hour the temperature goes up another degree. The weight of my solo pack slowly wears me down, and both us us have to drink water constantly. I am sweating so much, I am also taking salt tabs. The view at the top is stunning, and I can see the basin I hope to reach by days end, but the line between me and there is VERY indirect. I must now descend about 2,500ft. to Seneca Lake, and then begin climbing once again to get to Island Lake. At first I think my summit rest has renewed my strength, but as I descend, I find myself stumbling and struggling under my pack weight. When we finally reach Seneca and shed our packs, Belle flops to the ground in a meadow and zones out immediately. Then, as I sit taking in our new location, I realize I am also toast, and there is NO WAY I am putting the pack on again, and going back up a 1,500ft. trail. It is mid-afternnon, and we are here for the night.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2018, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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Weekly Post: The Higher You Get, The Higher You Get by Robert Glenn Ketchum

by Robert Glenn Ketchum


Growing up my parents had a home near Sun Valley, Idaho. It was there that I learned to ski. Over many years I befriended members of the Decker Flats Climbing and Frisbee Club, with whom I had both life, and art-forming outdoor experiences. I had my camera, and these are my adventures.  Enjoy!!  ~Robert Glenn Ketchum



Monday, September 24, 2018

The Higher You Get, The Higher You Get - Sun Valley and the DFC&FC, #125:
THE HIGHER YOU GET, THE HIGHER YOU GET, #125:  Finally the 4-wheel drive road our 6-person skiing expedition into Boulder Basin is following, arrives at its highest point and flattens out. This is a good thing because we are all tired from struggling up the last steep section of our ascent. More relaxed now that we are at this point, we stop to have some water and snacks. Jon Davis, Gordon, and I actually take our packs off and do a bit a ski-exploring. The weather has turned for the worse, but it is not especially windy, and snowfall only comes in flurries, so we are all quite comfortable, and slowly recovering as we momentarily relax and revive. The terrain around us, is now quite different. The forest of trees in the canyon has given way to the relatively “open” expanse of Boulder Basin, and all of it is encircled by dramatic, rugged peaks. The evergreen pines are here, but fewer in number, and one of my favorite tress, the limber pine, whose beautiful, twisted trunks make them one of my favorite subjects, have asserted themselves as sculptural forms dotted across the alpine landscape. This one called out to me.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2018, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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Friday, September 21, 2018

Weekly Post, FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977 by Robert Glenn Ketchum

FISHFARMS:  Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977
by Robert Glenn Ketchum



In 1977, I was commissioned by Elisabeth Mann Borgese to help do research, interviews, and take photographs for a book she was writing about worldwide aquaculture. It would be published by Harry N. Abrams, one of the world’s premier publishing houses, famous for their beautiful books. It would also involve around-the-world travel to 8 countries, and some of the most remarkable places I would ever visit. SEAFARM: The Story of Aquaculture was a very successful publication featuring over 100 of my images, and an exhibit I assembled with support from Nikon, became a Smithsonian traveling exhibition for 6-yrs., viewed by over 6-million people.  ~Robert Glenn Ketchum





Friday, September 21, 2018

FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #22:
Fish Farms #22:  India is a large continent, and one of the most populated. To provide sufficient protein to many millions, India has been engaged in aquaculture practices for hundreds of years. In fact, India has some of the most diverse forms of fishfarming of any of the countries we will visit, so Elisabeth wants to see as many different forms of it's practice as possible, and that takes a lot of organizing. Unlike Russia, where the government did not care to show us what they were doing, India wants us to see it all, and that means nearly two weeks of extensive travel to very differing parts of the country. Organizing this requires some time, so we wait in Mumbai, while our trip is being organized. We actually do visit an amazing facility in Mumbai, whose practices I find shocking, slightly disgusting, and yet, TRULY BRILLIANT. If Mumbai has anything, it has a lot of sewage, so this aquaculture adaptation uses that material. Not far outside of the central city, Elisabeth and I are taken to a more rural area where there is an extensive array of ponds, each separated from the other by a walkable dike. All of the ponds have multiple industrial aerators, furiously sucking up pond water and then spraying it back into the ponds again. This is liquified sewage. Surprisingly, the ponds TEEM with fish! These are carp, and there are A LOT of them. This is an experimental project that appears to be working. In each pond there are 6 different species of carp, and each “feeds” at a different level of the pond. No additional feed is given to the fish, other than the aerated sewage. The project has been going for some years, and the fish are rigorously tested for cancer, toxins, and dangerous microbes, but NOTHING has been found to date. The considerable "white-meat” bodies of the carp, test and re-test as clean, pure, and edible, despite what they are being fed. The Indians believe the carp is a “gift from god,” that might well be significant in recycling sewage into edible protein. Simply AMAZING!. Aside from this visit, we have time to kill while plans are made, so as I mentioned in previous posts, Elisabeth likes to taxi-bicycle about the city to “relax" and enjoy watching the “street-life.” Most foreign visitors, do exactly the opposite, hiring taxis with curtains on their windows, which they close, so as NOT to see or be seen. It is all very amusing to me, as I watch (and photograph) the often shocked reaction of those encountering us, very startled to see foreign visitors using this decidedly local form of transportation.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2018, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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Thursday, September 20, 2018

Weekly Post: STONED IMMACULATE: A Trip in the Desert by Robert Glenn Ketchum

STONED IMMACULATE:  A Trip in the Desert
by Robert Glenn Ketchum


As a young photographer, two places I “discovered” by chance greatly influenced both my photographic vision and my personal relationship with the greater planet. A previous blog, LIMEKILN, is the story of the first location. THIS is the second location which I discovered because my car broke down. As Jim Morrison/The Doors wrote, “Out here we is stoned Immaculate!"



Thursday, September 20, 2018
“Tangaroa Tropopause"
circa 1985-1995
Stoned Immaculate, #97:
Immaculate, #97:  from the portfolio, STONED IMMACULATE

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2018, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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Weekly Post, SUNDANCE: Artist-In-Residence by Robert Glenn Ketchum

SUNDANCE:  Artist In Residence
by Robert Glenn Ketchum



From 1987-1989, Robert Redford invited me to become the first visual Artist-In-Residence at his newly established Sundance Institute, part of the community he was building around his recently purchased ski resort in Utah. The residency provided me with subject matter that produced some of the most significant images of my career, but importantly, it also afforded me my first aerial work, a platform that would become increasingly important throughout my life. A limited amount of these images were ever published, and NONE of the aerials ever were. The best will now appear, please enjoy!  ~Robert Glenn Ketchum






Thursday, September 20, 2018

SUNDANCE: Artist In Residence, #10:
Sundance #10:  When I discussed being an Artist-In-Residence at Sundance with Robert Redford, I asked what he wanted me to do,..if he had a purpose. His response was that he knew of me through my many years of work with the Natural Resources Defense Council trying to stop the destructive and unnecessary logging of the Tongass rainforest, and he felt it surely took a lot of effort. His idea is that I come to Sundance to enjoy its community of artists and athletes, and if I feel like taking pictures, it is not a requirement, but I may shoot whatever I want. He thinks Sundance is beautiful, which I should enjoy, but there is no agenda for whatever work I might do. He simply hopes the environment will inspire me. On my first visit, I am simply trying to get a feel for this landscape, which clearly is, as Redford described - dramatic and beautiful, BUT my environmentally pro-active mind cannot help but notice the building of the huge dam, lake, and 8-lane highway through the Heber Valley, and then there is this (above). The Great Salt Lake basin, is much like the Los Angeles basin, in that it is a low valley floor, surrounded by mountains. Given the amount of traffic and industry present in the Salt Lake basin, a lot of pollution is generated in the form of smog. In the winter, the cold air puts a “cap” on the pollution, trapping it on the valley floor. On bad days, the smog is so thick, it looks like a fog, and obscures everything. I will probably make some images of that as well.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2018, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Weekly Post, ARCTIC: At the Cutting Edge of Climate Change

ARCTIC:  At the Cutting Edge of Climate Change
by Robert Glenn Ketchum



In 1993, I began traveling to the Arctic. I have been across The Northwest Passage by yacht; to the North Pole twice; to little-visited Russian islands; and aboard research vessels in Greenland, Labrador, Newfoundland, and Baffin Island, taking the opportunity to visit Iqualuit, the capital of Nunavut, the recently created Inuit nation and territories.





Wednesday, September 19, 2018


ARCTIC:  At the Cutting Edge of Climate Change, #110:
ARCTIC, #110:  Bill Simon’s somewhat risky gamble to follow the wake of the Sir John Franklin in an attempt to extract us and Itasca from our ice-locked position, pays off. The SJF was departing after their contact with us, to head northwest, up through the M'Clintoch Channel, from where all the pack ice had come. Tailgating them for a short distance, allows us to get out of the entrapping ice, and once we do, we then turn sharply right, and run close to the western shoreline of Prince of Wales Island, which has more open water. Hugging the shore, Itasca works her way around the southern tip of Prince of Wales, and then turns north and east, into the strait that will ultimately connect us with Lancaster Sound, further north. While not ice free, the strait is VERY navigable, and so we have circumvented what all agreed would be the most dangerous crux of our entire journey. Now we all have hope we ARE actually going to get through the Northwest Passage in a single season. Finally in this kinder environment, and out of the ice entrapment, Bill is excited to move forward, and eager to make up for time lost while were were locked in the floes, so Itasca hoist anchor at daybreak and begins the journey north between Prince of Wales and the extended arm of the mainland peninsula (above). The sunrise is beautiful, and there is weather, but the cloud ceiling is high, so of course, Bill wants the helicopter to go scout ahead, and given the conditions, I can’t wait to be airborne once again.

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2018, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Weekly Post: Adventuring on the Yakutat Forelands - Bowing before St. Elias by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Adventuring on the Yakutat Forelands - Bowing before St. Elias
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

The Yakutat Forelands are where the Tongass rainforest and the Chugach forest to the north meet. It is also home to many large glaciers, a stunning coastline, the huge Alsek-Tatshenshini river, and Icy Bay, which sits at the foot of Mount St. Elias, the greatest vertical rise from sea level in the world. There is a lot of powerful energy out here.



Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Adventuring on the Yakutat Forelands - Bowing before St. Elias, #89:
The Yakutat Forelands, #89:  Following our sobering encounter with the massive mud avalanche, we retreat to camp for a relatively uneventful evening, which also sees the brutal storm dissipate. We actually have a very civil, and relatively dry evening, and when we retire, it seems the sky is breaking open. The next morning proves to be quite nice, and so we intend to follow our plan, which is to paddle up the Taan Fjord, and approach the actual foot of Mt. Saint Elias, the greatest vertical displacement on the planet from sea level. Having survived the last three days being pounded by a terrible wind storm, we are all fairly confident such an event will not repeat itself anytime soon. As we pack the kayaks, the day only gets better. In this picture, the entrance to the Taan Fjord is in the distance, and the fjord where we experienced the avalanche is behind my POV. During our paddle into the Taan, the sun finally breaks through, and by the time we reach our next camp, it is a very nice day, and warming. This a great opportunity for us dry out all of our gear, so we set up in a rocky cove, and spread tents and sleeping bags out to dry. Many in our party nap or sunbath, and no one gets back in the boats this day. Come evening, we have a great dinner, and the positive mood of our group returns. Most of us finally get some uninterrupted sleep because the wind is no longer howling in our ears, or rattling our tents. The next morning has clouds, but it is not storming, so we break camp, planning to move farther up the fjord.

photograph(s) © copyright, Robert Glenn Ketchum, 2018, @RbtGlennKetchum, @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Tuesday, September 18, 2018

Weekly Post: NO PEBBLE MINE: Pictures from Ground Zero by Robert Glenn Ketchum

NO PEBBLE MINE Pictures from Ground Zero
by Robert Glenn Ketchum



Since 1998, I have been working to protect the spectacular resources of southwest Alaska and the fishery of Bristol Bay. Two Aperture books, a national traveling exhibition, a massive coalition of concerned users, and a lot of personal lobbying, had it looking like we were almost there. Then Donald Trump took office claiming he would always put America, and American jobs first. SO WHY destroy a BILLION-dollar-a-year, RENEWABLE salmon fishery and over 100,000 jobs for a group of international mineral speculators that will leave us with a Superfund site to clean up, and NO fishery left edible? And yet, he did,..so please, keep saying NO TO THE PEBBLE MINE!
~Robert Glenn Ketchum






Tuesday, September 18, 2018 

NO PEBBLE MINE #314, Pictures from Ground Zero
NO PEBBLE MINE #314:  My pilot tells me that he occasionally brings hunters up into this world of huge, tundra-covered rolling hills, and lush river valleys, but he notes that there are only a few points of access for them, and most of the terrain is SO untracked and rugged, that it limits their ability to move about. Obviously, there are no landing strips up here, so we are headed for a lake to land upon, so that I can get out on the ground and have a look around. I do see some small lakes, and occasionally clusters of tundra ponds, but nothing in my field of view is big enough to host a landing. A pilot needs a lake of a certain size to accommodate both a landing AND a take-off, and since we have entered this domain, I have not seen a big enough body of water for us to put down. Nonetheless, he assures me we are headed towards one, so we fly on, slowly approaching some very pronounced summits.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2018, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd @NRDC @OrvisFlyFishing #NoPebbleMine #LittleBearProd

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Friday, September 14, 2018

Weekly Post: The Daze of My Life: Robert Glenn Ketchum, An Autobiography


Biographies are studies of someone's life based on cumulative research. Good ones may reveal something, but probably barely scratch the surface of what actually went on. The internet is allowing me to do something VERY different. 
~Robert Glenn Ketchum




Friday, September 14, 2018

The Daze of My Life:  Robert Glenn Ketchum, An Autobiography #115: Daze, #115:  Laurance Rockefeller is part of the Rockefeller family that built Rockefeller Center, home to Nikon House where my aquaculture exhibit is about to have an opening reception. He is also good friends with John Bryant, Director of the National Park Foundation, for whom I am currently doing research for the proposed exhibit and book, American Photographers and the National Parks. I am VERY honored that Laurance and his wife Mary have come to see my show, but I assume that is because John has prevailed upon them to do so. Of course, I invite them in, and after pleasantries are passed between all, Laurance and Mary are eager to have me walk them through my SEAFARM exhibit. As I learn in our conversation, Laurance is a very progressive venture capitalist, and he has various investments in aquaculture worldwide, so he came to see my exhibit, because he knows a lot about the subject, and is struck by such an exhibit showing up “at his front door.” The three of us have a marvelous 1/2-hour conversation as we encircle the room, and then they want to leave before the doors open to the public. Bear with me here! When in LA, bedsides working with Michael Wilder to print this show, I am busily printing the 24 images for my soon-to-be-published, B&W portfolio, “WINTERS: 1979-1980". I have finished about 1/2 of the 24-print sets for the proposed edition of 20. Nikon House has a small, intimate gallery on their second floor, that is supposed to host another photographers show during my exhibit. At the last minute, he cancels, and Nikon House asks me if I have a smaller body of work that I might place in that gallery, so I send them the portfolio. Now, as I walk Laurance and Mary toward the exit, Laurance asks if I do other work, so I tell him some is in the second floor gallery, if he would like to see it. They would like, so I escort them upstairs. The two of them become very quiet, leave me, and walk around independently. It is a small space, and dark, so the radiant whiteness of my images is glowing on the walls. Mary keeps making quiet sounds of interest and approval, and occasionally Laurance says something like, “remarkable,” or “I have never seen a photograph like this.” I am hoping this is a good thing, BUT the work in the portfolio is an OBVIOUS break with the traditions of landscape photography represented in the previous generation, such as Ansel Adams, so I am still unsure if the Rockefellers like these prints, or are just shocked. After a time, the two collect themselves, and once again begin their departure. At the top of the stairs, Laurance turns to me and says that these images are some of the most beautiful and exciting photography he and Mary have encountered, and he feels I understand the landscape in a “completely new way.” Then, they are out into the cold winter night, and I return to my other guests. Above is the portfolio box for WINTERS, designed by the Randolph and Claudia Laub Studio in LA. Playing on the notably rectangular shape of a print from a full-frame 35mm negative, AND the abstract and minimalism reflected in most of my images, I copy an Asian design idea. The portfolio box is wrapped in brilliantly white, textured rice paper. The portfolio title has been debossed in silver. The “chop” has also been debossed in “Chinese” red, and has been created from the signature of my initials, RGK. “WINTERS: 1970-1980” sold out many years ago. Most portfolios went to private collections, but I am happy to say that the Amon Carte Museum (TX), the Katzen Museum/American University (DC), the Hudson River Museum (NY), the National Museum of American Art (DC), and the Huntington Library, Collections and Botanical Gardens (LA) all have it in their holdings.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2018 
@RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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Monday, August 20, 2018

TERRA FIRMA Exhibit at the Manhattan Beach Art Center featuring Robert Glenn Ketchum


When at UCLA, Ketchum studied with two very non-traditional photography practitioners, Edmund Teske and Robert Heinecken. Ketchum was especially influenced by Heinecken's use of many different materials in presenting his photographic imagery, some of which involved cloth and fabric. Working with UCLA, in 1985, Ketchum became the first American artist to enter their China exchange program. This began a 30-year collaboration with a nationally prestigious Chinese embroidery guild, to translate his photographs of the natural world into embroideries and loom weavings, of which two of the most recent are displayed here.


Graceful Branch Movement_ 2010
Graceful Branch Movement, 2010

One of the largest 2-sided embroidery panels ever created, featuring the untraditional use of two stitches that were never previously combined. The detailed leaves are done in the most laborious "Suzhou fine style," and all the other background work is done in the "random" stitch. There more than 40 dye colors used, and the work took several embroiderers 3-years.

Thursday, July 12, 2018

Weekly Post: Big Mountain and Glacier National Park - Expanding My Winter Consciousness

Big Mountain and Glacier National Park - 
Expanding My Winter Consciousness
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

In the early '70’s, I was doing a lot of winter adventuring with my friends in the Decker Flats Climbing and Frisbee Club, and a client invited me to take pictures at Big Mountain, a ski resort in Montana. Glacier National Park was not far away, so I thought that might be an interesting place to explore in the winter, as well. These two locations added important work to my exhibits and portfolios, and definitely expanded/sobered my winter consciousness.




Thursday, July 12, 2018

Big Mountain and Glacier National Park - Expanding My Winter Consciousness, #50:
Big Mountain, #50:  Bob Tchirkow and I finally arrive at Avalanche Lake which is frozen over, and we are certainly in a BASIN. Except for the direction from which we have come, the sheer walls rise straight up all around us, and disappear into the snowfall that is not only heavy, but the flakes have become gigantic as well. The open expanse of the lake runs right up to the walls, and there is no gorge now between us and an avalanche. Still boggled by the one we witnessed as we came in, neither he nor I want to get any nearer to the walls than where we already are. We choose a huge tree on our side that has a wind hollow beneath it, and we crawl in there, out of the weather, to drink, snack, and occasionally poke my camera out and take a shot. The above image, “Avalanche Lake Basin (Headwalls in a Blizzard)” becomes another from this trip to be included in my future portfolio, “Winters: 1970-1980,” and a larger print of this will also be included in “Silver See,” a portfolio, published by the Los Angeles Center for Photographic Studies. Once again, unfortunately, Bob and I misjudge the short winter day. Our journey back down the trail is more dangerous than we expect. Going downslope with so many trees is pretty ragged, there is a lot of falling,..and then it starts to get dark. When we fall in the heavy, wet snow, it clings, making our clothes wet as well,..and we are tiring. Then, rather abruptly in the growing darkness, the roar of the creek is close once again, and the bridge appears before us. We are back! Crossing the bridge to head for camp, we encounter a BIG, shaggy, snow-covered mountain goat, that just stands and stares at us, then disappears into the trees. I am sure we surprised him. Camp is a mess, as the heavy snow has squashed the tent and covered equipment. One of our two stoves will no longer light, and almost everything is wet. We survive the night, ski out in the early morning hours, and have a GREAT breakfast in a cafe. One feature story in POWDER magazine, and three new images for my portfolio are part of my expanding winter consciousness, and I hope you have enjoyed these “visits” to Montana that helped to shape my career.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2018, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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Friday, May 18, 2018

2018 Venice Art Walk Featuring Robert Glenn Ketchum


For more than 20yrs. I have contributed to this event. It is VERY fun!. Because of some significant sales in the past few years, I have been allowed an “oversized” contribution this year, as the committee recognizes my images have amazing detail that is best viewed at a larger scale. “Rivers of Life” is stunning at 40” wide. Come to the Google offices - view all the work being exhibited and auctioned. Eat, drink, be merry, enjoy music, AND bid up my piece. Help support healthcare for all!



Wednesday, April 18, 2018

Remembering Barbara Bush


In 1987, Aperture published my book, 'The Tongass: Alaska’s Vanishing Rain Forest', which was intended to support the proposed Tongass Timber Reform Act. In the ensuing years, I spent much time in DC, exhibiting, lecturing, and lobbying on behalf of the bill’s passage. The most significant timber reform legislation in American history passed in 1990, and was signed into law by President George H.W. Bush. He then invited me to the White House in 1991 to acknowledge my contributions to the effort. For the photo-op, I was ushered into a room to find both he and Barbara awaiting me. We “socialized” while the pictures were being taken, and even in such a brief period, I was struck by Barbara’s presence. The president and I exchanged formalities, and he made sure I knew he had seen the book and knew my story, as I would have expected on this occasion. Barbara, however, was like speaking with my mother, in spite of the fact I am sporting a mohawk, a long ponytail, and a diamond-stud earring, and I am sure she was glad I was not her son. Nonetheless, she wanted to know if I was married, had kids, took them with me, were my adventures scary, did I enjoy sleeping in tents - you know, mom stuff - not a word about the politics of the situation. I have never had anyone make me feel some comfortable, in an otherwise “stiff” situation, so thank you Barbara Bush for meeting with me that day as well, and may you rest in peace.

To further this story a bit, I brought along my newest Aperture book, Overlooked In America: The Success and Failure of Federal Land Management which I gave to the President during the photo-op. Given the title of the book, and the nature of my politics, the President smiled broadly for a picture holding the book, and then put it aside. After speaking with me for awhile, Barbara turned and picked it up, opening it and leafing through the pages, complimenting my pictures and asking about their locations. She was a skillful weaving of necessary Washington formality, and honest, human interest.

Orvis Supports No Pebble Mine

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