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Monday, June 27, 2016

WEEKLY POST: The Higher You Get, The Higher You Get by Robert Glenn Ketchum

by Robert Glenn Ketchum


Growing up my parents had a home near Sun Valley, Idaho. It was there that I learned to ski. Over many years I befriended members of the Decker Flat Climbing and Frisbee Club, with whom I had both life, and art-forming outdoor experiences. I had my camera, and these are my adventures.




Monday, June 27, 2016

The Higher You Get, The Higher You Get - Sun Valley and the DFC&FC, #8:
THE HIGHER YOU GET, THE HIGHER YOU GET - Sun Valley and the DFC&FC, #8:  I was a VERY unschooled photographer and so I had not really been concerned with the technical aspects of image-making. Now that I was turning my attention to the landscape and starting to work with larger cameras and film, I began to explore what those techniques might be. I loved the intense foreground-to-background detail that can be achieved by adjusting the aperture of the lens, so I began to work more with a tripod because making the aperture adjustment also causes a much slower shutter speed. With the Sun Valley winter as my subject matter, I was often confronted by brilliant lighting that tested the limits of what the film could record as well. And, I did not have to go far to put all of that into play. The home my parents leased was on Wood River Drive in Ketchum, and the large house and property stretched from the street to the banks of the Wood River. This image was made shortly after sunrise following an all-night snowfall, and I am standing at the edge of the three-car garage, looking through the trees toward neighbor's homes. Depth-of-field? Check! Extreme exposure? Check! Now, run back inside and warm up that pathetic camera.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2016, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Where It All Began: LIMEKILN CREEK by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Where It All Began:  Limekiln Creek by Robert Glenn Ketchum

In 1967, I discovered Limekiln Creek on the Big Sur Coast in California. Among those redwoods, I had an epiphany as a young artist. As a photographer, most of the skills I would use, I would learn there. Many years later in a mature career, I helped the American Land Conservancy acquire this property for the California State Park system. This is the story of a very personal place.



Monday, June 27, 2016

Where It All Began:  Limekiln Creek, #26
Where It All Began - Limekiln Creek, #26:  After a few more log crossings, there is a bend in the creek and you enter a new part of the "trail" that has high steep rock walls on both sides and little room to navigate. In this shot I have come in from the left side of the frame and you can see the wider part of the Limekiln canyon (down canyon) in the distance. From this POV you can also see how abruptly the canyon wall now rises on the right. Standing here and taking it all in, I began to realize the sound of the creeks next to me and below me in the other canyon were changed subtly as I rounded the bend and entered the narrows. What I was now hearing was also a water noise which is why I probably did not notice at first, but as I listened more closely the new sound was more robust, louder in a different way, and clearly it seemed to increase in volume with every forward step I made picking my way along the edge of the rock walls.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2016, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd, #LittleBearProd, ALC (@american_land), Monterey Pop Festival (@MontereyPopFest)
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Friday, June 24, 2016

Weekly Post: SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient by Robert Glenn Ketchum

SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient by Robert Glenn Ketchum

During the reign of Mao (1949-1976), China was a closed country. China in the 1980’s was 80% rural, with no outside visitors, particularly from the West. When China opened to travelers, the Chinese government placed severe limitations on who was allowed to enter the country. These photographs are a continuation of other ongoing blog threads of the first glimpses into China in the mid-1980’s by world-renowned Conservation Photographer Robert Glenn Ketchum.




Friday, June 24, 2016


SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient, #122
SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient #122 - 1985 to the Present:   And finally, there is this, or these as the case may be. If you are confused by this, so was I, and I was standing there. Besides the architectural light show scrolling around on the tall buildings, and the other neon nuttiness floating and driving by, in this particular district, the street lights have been replaced by this display. There are trees that line the sidewalks and so large, bright spotlights have been put in the cradle where the first branching out occurs. This is A LOT of light and it illuminates all the upper branches against the dark of the night sky. Select trees even have colored gels over their light. ALL the trees, however, have their branches strung with a lighting display I have not yet seen elsewhere. It consists of a glow stick about 3ft in length that hangs from a cord. The stick lies dark for a moment, then a flash lights up the top, and that glowing ball then descends the length of the stick, much like a drop of water. The effect of this along the entire street was pretty off the chart, and gave new meaning to the phrase, "a light rain is falling."
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2016, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #China #Shanghai

Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism & Art Online:
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Thursday, June 23, 2016

Weekly Post: SUZHOU, 1985-to the present by RobertGlennKetchum

Welcome to Suzhou, 1985 - to the present by Robert Glenn Ketchum

During the reign of Mao (1949-1976), China was a closed country. China in the 1980’s was 80% rural, with no outside visitors, particularly from the West. When China opened to travelers, the Chinese government placed severe limitations on who was allowed to enter the country. These photographs are a continuation of other ongoing blog threads of the first glimpses into China in the mid-1980’s by world-renowned Conservation Photographer 
Robert Glenn Ketchum.



Thursday, June 23, 2016

Welcome to Suzhou, 1985 - to the present, #123
Suzhou #123:   I was in a relatively new hotel, but it had been built by Chinese investors, not an international group, and so there were many features to the hotel grounds that not only echoed the culture but the historic gardens around Suzhou. This is a small section of the hotel garden between rooms, replete with a designed stone path, various Taihu rocks, a small moon bridge, and lush vegetation. As the back wall of the hotel lies adjacent an historic park and garden, one of these paths through the hotel grounds leads to an unannounced gate from which guests may access that park. The gardens within the historic park are quite nice as well, but the main attraction to me are the numerous, well-renovated structures that date back centuries. One of those is an original canal gate through the a remaining portion of the fortified wall built around the heart of the old city. The other is a VERY tall ancient pagoda tower. Amazing! Next week, come take a walk in the park with me. 
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2016, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #China #Suzhou

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Weekly Post: SILK ROAD - Embroideries of Robert Glenn Ketchum

Silk Road - Embroideries of Robert Glenn Ketchum


The city of Suzhou, China, produced China's most beautiful silk and silk embroidery practiced by generational families for 3,000 years. My purpose in going to China starting in the mid-1980's was to turn my photographs into textiles, and this is my story. ~Robert Glenn Ketchum





Thursday, June 23, 2016

Silk Road - Embroideries #179
SILK ROAD #179:   By this time we had done many embroideries with trees and the rendering of them had become a challenge to "improve" their stitch design with each new subject. In the case of "Lakeshore in Morning Fog," the trees were clustered along the shoreline but actually only occupied a small part of the image, so the embroiderers lavished a great deal of time on them using a wide variety of stitches and integrating them in complicated ways. This detail features random stitching, bundle stitches in layers, and looping stitches, which were intended as highlights. I also chose this detail because you can see the matrix clearly. A pale green color was chosen and there has been no stitching of any kind done in the sky. As this embroidery developed, Zhang repeatedly reminded me that the subtle mottling of the sky tones was my problem, and I assured her that I had a plan that would compliment the beautiful work being done.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2016, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #Embroidery @WesCFA @RSSDesigns
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Wednesday, June 22, 2016

Weekly Post: TATSHESHINI: Saving a River Wild

TATSHENSHINI:  Saving a River Wild by Robert Glenn Ketchum


In 1990, I was invited on a 10-day float down the Tatshenshini, a huge river system flowing from Western Canada to the Pacific Ocean that literally divides two of North America's largest national parks, Canada's Kluane National Park and Alaska's Glacier Bay National Park. A gold mine was being proposed mid-river. I broke the story in LIFE magazine. There were many other articles and a book. The mine was never developed and the river is now a wilderness corridor. This is a conservation SUCCESS story!



Wednesday, June 22, 2016

TATSHENSHINI:  Saving a River Wild, #107
TATSHENSHINI - Saving a River Wild, #107:   It was late and the sun was getting low on the horizon. The clear air was bathed in the glow of evening. Often cold winds flow down off of glaciers, especially late in the day, but amazingly tonight as the sun was setting, the wind picked-up AND IT WAS WARM! Sitting on the sandy point pondering and taking pictures, I watched two fairly large bergs finally drift by, and it was notable that driven by the wind, they were REALLY moving along. Soon we would get back in our rafts and push off, entering the lake and floating along the western shore to pass around a rocky dome. On the other side of the dome is a large sandy beach adjacent the Alsek River outlet to the Pacific, which we would float the next day to our pick-up point. As one last stretch for my body, I walked over the berm to the small cove that looks directly east at glaciers coming out of Canada. The last time I was here, the winds off the glacier had driven massive amounts of driftwood into the cove (post #43), but tonight it looked VERY different!
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2016, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #Tatshenshini @glacierbaynps @Life @Wilderness #WeAreTheWild @nature_AK

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Weekly Post: NO PEBBLE MINE: Pictures from Ground Zero by RobertGlennKetchum

NO PEBBLE MINE Pictures from Ground Zero 
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Thank you to the EPA for recognizing the value of the Bristol Bay fishery. 
NOW, what can we do to protect this habitat further? 
Mission: To protect the national parks and national refuges of southwest Alaska, 
and the Bristol Bay fishery from the development of the Pebble mine, and other commercial risks.


Wednesday, June 22, 2016 

NO PEBBLE MINE #197, Pictures from Ground Zero:
NO PEBBLE MINE #197, Pictures from Ground Zero:   While some of the tundra landscape can be traversed if it is high and dry enough, most of it is a thrash that gives you the ILLUSION you can walk through it unimpeded, but you can't. Here is a classic reality check. From the boat as we approached this shore, it looked like willows and grasses that we might be able to push through. Once actually in the terrain, it becomes much more complex with boulders and fallen logs "hiding" beneath the tundra mat. Since most of the time it is raining, everything is wet and slippery, and it is easy to turn an ankle or stumble and smash your knee into something hard you can't even see. You CAN hike in this environment, BUT it is VERY slow going. As my 1st nation friends pointed out, "come back in winter, everything is frozen and you can walk anywhere you like." We WILL do that!
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2016, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd @NRDC @OrvisFlyFishing #NoPebbleMine #LittleBearProd

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Monday, May 2, 2016

Weekly Post: THE HUDSON RIVER AND THE HIGHLANDS by Robert Glenn Ketchum

by Robert Glenn Ketchum


This is the story of my first major commission and book, THE HUDSON RIVER AND THE HIGHLANDS (Aperture, 1985). In 1984, #StephenShore, #WilliamClift, and I received a 2-year commission from the Lila Acheson Wallace Fund to photograph the #HudsonRiverValley. This blog tells the tale of the book, with many photos not seen before. Enjoy!




Monday, May 2, 2016


THE HUDSON RIVER AND THE HIGHLANDS #187:
HUDSON RIVER #187:   I thought I would end this blog with this image because most of what you have seen in my posts of the #HudsonRiver have been the "lower" river, a much bigger, broader body of water than these two small streams. However, from small streams, greater rivers grow. The Hudson is born from a small, somewhat swampy pond in the higher elevations of #Mt.Marcy, at 5,344ft, the tallest peak in #NewYorkState. #LakeTearOfTheClouds spawns a rivulet that is debatably acknowledged as the source of the Hudson, but others argue the #OpalescentRiver is the source. Regardless, before you lies their juncture. The Hudson comes in from the left, and the Opalescent from the right. A definitive view point, a beautiful fall day, the ruins of some old stone architecture, and not a #HudsonRiverSchool painter in sight. I hope you have enjoyed this body of my work. Although my Hudson River blog is ending, I am using my blogs as my autobiography, so we are starting a new post which I hope you will follow: THE HIGHER YOU GET, THE HIGHER YOU GET - Sun Valley and the Decker Flat Climbing and Frisbee Club.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2016, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd @Wallacefdn @Aperturefnd @PentaxOnline
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Orvis Supports No Pebble Mine

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