Orvis ®

icon icon

Thursday, July 27, 2017

Lumière Gallery, PICTURES IN MOTION featuring Robert Glenn Ketchum, et al

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017 
@RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
Photography Exhibit at Lumière Gallery, Atlanta
NOW ON VIEW UNTIL AUGUST 25, 2017

Wednesday, July 26, 2017

Weekly Post: Adventuring on the Yakutat Forelands - Bowing before St. Elias by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Adventuring on the Yakutat Forelands - Bowing before St. Elias
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

The Yakutat Forelands are where the Tongass rainforest and the Chugach forest to the north meet. It is also home to many large glaciers, a stunning coastline, the huge Alsek-Tatshenshini river, and Icy Bay, which sits at the foot of Mount St. Elias, the greatest vertical rise from sea level in the world. There is a lot of powerful energy out here.



Wednesday, July 26, 2017

Adventuring on the Yakutat Forelands - Bowing before St. Elias, #29:
The Yakutat Forelands, #29:  As the minutes pass by, the sky grows increasingly clear. The Yakutat Forelands spread out before us all the way to the shores of the Pacific (far to the right). Aglow in this Alaskan twilight, the meadows roll off like fields of gold, punctuated by kettle ponds and various clusters of trees. Those are the same trees we were wandering around in at the beginning of this trip, when we stopped at our first cabin near the Alsek-Tatshenshini River. That IS the Alsek that you can see coming in from the left in this image, and winding its way to the coast. It is a VERY different view of things we have from up here. Beyond the Alsek, out of this frame to the left, are the numerous snow-capped summits of Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, which are still engulfed in the clouds of passing weather. That weather is coming from the west, off of the Pacific and blowing eastward, inland. There is always the chance that the clearing sky above us and the ocean, might clear from those summits as well, but after a day like today, perhaps that is asking too much. OR NOT!
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
____________________________________________________

Weekly Post:, ARCTIC: At the Cutting Edge of Climate Change

ARCTIC:  At the Cutting Edge of Climate Change
by Robert Glenn Ketchum



In 1993, I began traveling to the Arctic. I have been across The Northwest Passage by yacht; to the North Pole twice; to little-visited Russian islands; and aboard research vessels in Greenland, Labrador, Newfoundland, and Baffin Island, taking the opportunity to visit Iqualuit, the capital of Nunavut, the recently created Inuit nation and territories.











Wednesday, July 26, 2017

ARCTIC:  At the Cutting Edge of Climate Change, #50:
ARCTIC, #50:  Things are about to change, so viewing a map is once again useful. We have traveled to Cambridge Bay through the waterway that leads off the map to the left. Cambridge Bay is part of gigantic Victoria Island. For some time now our navigation has been relatively ice-free because we have been “protected” from the polar ice pack by the presence of that island to our north. As you can see here, when we leave Cambridge Bay, we are eventually exposed to waters that open to the north, and directly into the polar ice. It will be our first look at where we hope to find a route of passage. We will then continue east, slipping behind King William Island for a bit more protection. There is a two-fold purpose in this: one is that we hope to find more open water along the shoreline of the peninsula you see here that hosts the village of Taloyoak; the other is that John Bockstoce has “family” in Gjoa Haven, and we will stop there for an extended visit (several hours). In crossing from Cambridge Bay to Gjoa Haven, we will also bring on a helicopter and pilot that have flown out of Yellowknife to meet us. Things are about to get A LOT more interesting.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
____________________________________________________

Tuesday, July 25, 2017

Weekly Post: THE TONGASS: Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees by Robert Glenn Ketchum

THE TONGASS:  Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees
by Robert Glenn Ketchum
In 1985, I began a 2-year commission to explore the Tongass rainforest, the largest forest in the United States Forest Service (USFS) system AND the largest temperate rainforest in the world. It was a unique, old-growth environment under siege from industrial logging. The resulting investigative book I published helped to pass the Tongass Timber Reform Bill, protect 1,000,000 acres of old-growth, and create 11 new wilderness areas. This is the story of how that was achieved.








Tuesday, July 25, 2017

THE TONGASS:  Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees, #48:
THE TONGASS, #48:  We anchor toward the far end of the bay for the night, and there is a good bit of boating around in various ways before dark, as everyone wants to inspect the cove, look for game, or go fishing. As with many places that are new, it takes me awhile to absorb everything that is going on: the exploring; the numerous waterfalls; some shorline-scavanging bears we come across; eagles are everywhere (and their shrill cries echo around the fjord walls); and, the forest is dense and studded with very large trees. Back aboard “Observer” having had our evening adventure and dinner, I am sitting outside in a deck chair watching the sunset, and it suddenly dawns on me how big these walls really are. They are so lush with vegetation and so streaked by streaming falls, they are not like Yosemite, so much, as they remind me of the massive Garden Wall across which runs the Going-to-the Sun Highway in Glacier National Park. Gut Bay could be a park by any standard, but here in Alaska it is just another deep cove on the map.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
____________________________________________________

Weekly Post: NO PEBBLE MINE: Pictures from Ground Zero by Robert Glenn Ketchum

NO PEBBLE MINE Pictures from Ground Zero 
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Thank you to the EPA for recognizing the value of the Bristol Bay fishery. 
NOW, what can we do to protect this habitat further? 
Mission: To protect the national parks and national refuges of southwest Alaska, 
and the Bristol Bay fishery from the development of the Pebble mine, and other commercial risks.




Tuesday, July 25, 2017 


NO PEBBLE MINE #254, Pictures from Ground Zero:  
NO PEBBLE MINE #254:  To reach my winter base camp at Tikchik Narrows Lodge in Wood-Tikchik State Park, the owner, Bud Hodson, and I fly from Anchorage to the lodge in his small private plane. The lodge is closed, but I will stay at Bud’s nearby home. The plan is for me to use lodge equipment, like a snowmobile and sled, to explore whatever land-based imagery I can access. Additionally, a bear guide currently living on-property, preparing for hunting season, will take me flying in his scout plane that purportedly will afford me a “fantastic” platform to shoot from flying low and slow. At the moment, however, Bud and I have come over the Alaska range and into Southwest. The view below the wings on my last trip out was of vast expanses of tundra with streams and ponds. Now there is just a rolling, white plain occasionally punctuated by small tree clusters. Weather is streaming through, and spots of sunlight scroll across the landscape, but there is little to “spotlight.” As we approach the park, though, things begin to change. The mountains rise; clusters of dark pines pop up here and there; the weather becomes more pronounced; and, the light grows more dramatic. In MANY, MANY MILES now, and in every direction, I can see no sign of human presence. It feels VERY remote, AND as we enter the park and head towards the lodge, the taller mountains, and the bigger lakes, it will only seem MORE so.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd @NRDC @OrvisFlyFishing #NoPebbleMine #LittleBearProd



Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism Online:


_____________________________________________________

Monday, July 24, 2017

Weekly Post: The Higher You Get, The Higher You Get by Robert Glenn Ketchum

by Robert Glenn Ketchum


Growing up my parents had a home near Sun Valley, Idaho. It was there that I learned to ski. Over many years I befriended members of the Decker Flats Climbing and Frisbee Club, with whom I had both life, and art-forming outdoor experiences. I had my camera, and these are my adventures.





Monday, July 24, 2017

The Higher You Get, The Higher You Get - Sun Valley and the DFC&FC, #64:
THE HIGHER YOU GET, THE HIGHER YOU GET, #64:  Handwerk Peak is to the immediate right, and I have always thought it looks like the rear view of a lizard whose legs are splayed behind him (iguana-style). Its spine is the ridge leading to the summit, which has the shape of a head with a pointed nose. According to Gordon, our destination for the day is the high basin to the left, sitting just below the snow line, AND, he says, “we can get there in a simple traverse.” The Pioneers are a VERY DIFFERENT kind of mountain from the Sawtooths and Gordon is enjoying “introducing” us to this range that the DF&FC consider their backyard. The Sawtooths show a lot of notable, clean granite walls and summits, and although there are certainly boulder fields, it is seldom just shattered scree. The Pioneers are more weathered and completely shattered, all the way to their summits. Although there is plenty of granite, there is an awesome amount of scree and rubble as well, as you can see from the foreground ridge summit in post #62. Our path for the day, lies along an extension of that same ridge, running off to the left in this picture. The waethered limber pine along our route is spectacular, but so are some of the steep and unexpected scree ravines we encounter, that cause as to adjust our traverse line. Long hikes offer all day conversations about nearly anything, but as all of us except for Gordon are relatively newcomers to this terrain, he interjects our conversations with various stories and credos. The primary lesson for the day is “Never rise or fall more than you have to,” in reference to our line of traverse. Because the traverse is rugged, and always sloping left-to-right, Gordon also refers to our hike of step-forward, slide-two-steps-down as “sidehill granthing.” Well, sidehill granth we do!
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
____________________________________________________

Weekly Post: STONED IMMACULATE: A Trip in the Desert by Robert Glenn Ketchum

STONED IMMACULATE:  A Trip in the Desert
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

As a young photographer, two places I “discovered” by chance greatly influenced both my photographic vision and my personal relationship with the greater planet. A previous blog, LIMEKILN, is the story of the first location. THIS is the second location which I discovered because my car broke down. As Jim Morrison/The Doors wrote, “Out here we is stoned Immaculate!"





Monday, July 24, 2017


Stoned Immaculate, #38:
Immaculate, #38:  The, if I step back, there are new considerations. Walls and caves display killer color, but they also offer a kind of sculptural convolution that attracts me as I envision that perfect framing and printing will offer the illusion of the print surface having relief. I am also fairly certain that if I do print and exhibit these, viewers will say that these colors are altered. Most of us have seen images of strange, colored rocks in some desert, somewhere, BUT THIS spectacle is quite different. There are colors here I have NEVER seen elsewhere, and they are combined with a stunning array of textures, and some rock configurations that defy logic. Trying to work out my ideas, I do bring some of these images into print (posts #11 & #29), but the size of the print I would like to make is limited because I am shooting 35mm film. Also, the public seems to like, and buy, the “flatter” more colorful images, and some tell me they find the more sculptural subjects too “powerful.” What does that even mean?
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
____________________________________________________

Saturday, July 22, 2017

Orvis Supports No Pebble Mine

icon icon