Orvis ®

icon icon

Monday, June 18, 2018

Weekly Post: The Higher You Get, The Higher You Get by Robert Glenn Ketchum

by Robert Glenn Ketchum


Growing up my parents had a home near Sun Valley, Idaho. It was there that I learned to ski. Over many years I befriended members of the Decker Flats Climbing and Frisbee Club, with whom I had both life, and art-forming outdoor experiences. I had my camera, and these are my adventures.  Enjoy!!  ~Robert Glenn Ketchum



Monday, June 18, 2018

The Higher You Get, The Higher You Get - Sun Valley and the DFC&FC, #111:
THE HIGHER YOU GET, THE HIGHER YOU GET, #111:  DFC&FC colleague, Chris Puchner is on a free-climb to the summit of Goat Mountain in the Pioneers, and for awhile, we three who have chosen NOT to do the ascent sit by the giant boulder near the top of a basin, and watch as he works his way up. After we loose sight of him, however, the heat of the day begins to bear down on us because all the barren rock in the basin offers little respite. After lunch, some picture-taking, and a few naps, we decide to retreat from the boulder to what Gordon Williams promises is a cooler place. We backtrack along the “path” which we followed into the basin, but at the point we would start down to Kane Lake, we branch to the left instead, following the merging meltwaters as they head towards the plunge of the waterfall. We are on a relatively broad terrace, now more “garden” than rock, and in the midst of it is a “lake.” It is small, and narrow, but furrowed fairly deeply into the middle of a blooming meadow, and flowing with VERY cold water. Gordon suggests that we will wait here for Chris to downclimb as it will be easy for him to see us and reconnect. In the meantime, as relief to the heat of the day, we COULD all go “swimming.” We do. Then, as we are warming and drying ourselves in the late afternoon sun, a wild cry echoes around the walls from above, and Puchner appears at the top of a snowfield directly above us, amidst his descent.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2018, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism Online:
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
____________________________________________________

Weekly Post: STONED IMMACULATE: A Trip in the Desert by Robert Glenn Ketchum

STONED IMMACULATE:  A Trip in the Desert
by Robert Glenn Ketchum


As a young photographer, two places I “discovered” by chance greatly influenced both my photographic vision and my personal relationship with the greater planet. A previous blog, LIMEKILN, is the story of the first location. THIS is the second location which I discovered because my car broke down. As Jim Morrison/The Doors wrote, “Out here we is stoned Immaculate!"




Monday, June 18, 2018
“Magellanic Cloud"
circa 1985-1995

Stoned Immaculate, #84:
Immaculate, #84:  from the portfolio, STONED IMMACULATE

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2018, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism Online:
SOCIAL MEDIA by @LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
____________________________________________________

Friday, June 15, 2018

Weekly Post: The Daze of My Life: Robert Glenn Ketchum, An Autobiography


Biographies are studies of someone's life based on cumulative research. Good ones may reveal something, but probably barely scratch the surface of what actually went on. The internet is allowing me to do something VERY different. 
~Robert Glenn Ketchum




Friday, June 15, 2018

The Daze of My Life:  Robert Glenn Ketchum, An Autobiography #102:
Daze, #102:  After tour skiing during the morning in the big trees of Sequoia National Park, some friends and I have stopped on the road back down from the snow-covered Giant Forest, parked the car, and we are now “going over the side.” We are descending through vertical gardens into the Kaweah River Gorge. It is a spectacular climb through patches of wildflowers and flowering trees. The afternoon is hot, and the gorge even hotter, so there is cactus and agave in abundance, but amazingly, beneath the shade of the trees there are ferns and boulders blanketed by lush mosses. This is a world a very different micro-niches living immediately adjacent one another. This is also a good adventure,..but ONLY IF you are careful. The descent is steep and the route has to meander because of ledges and other obstacles. If you expect to get back up without getting stuck somewhere, you need to be able to retrace your route. The steep sections of exposed granite can be slippery, as this is no different then climbing in alpine rock, and it requires your care and attention. It may not seems as threatening because of all the vegetation, but the danger of falling is still there. Lastly, it is the vegetation, itself, that is one of the greatest threats. Interwoven with these verdant terraces is an abundance of poison oak. YOU NEED TO WATCH EVERYTHING YOU TOUCH, OR BRUSH UP AGAINST. This can be done. I have made this descent many times and never been infected, but others with me have not been so lucky. If you are cautious and watchful, this can be a VERY fun end to the day. If not, life will be unpleasant for WEEKS after!
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2018 
@RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

SOCIAL MEDIA by @LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
____________________________________________________

Weekly Post, FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977 by Robert Glenn Ketchum

FISHFARMS:  Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977
by Robert Glenn Ketchum



In 1977, I was commissioned by Elisabeth Mann Borgese to help do research, interviews, and take photographs for a book she was writing about worldwide aquaculture. It would be published by Harry N. Abrams, one of the world’s premier publishing houses, famous for their beautiful books. It would also involve around-the-world travel to 8 countries, and some of the most remarkable places I would ever visit. SEAFARM: The Story of Aquaculture was a very successful publication featuring over 100 of my images, and an exhibit I assembled with support from Nikon, became a Smithsonian traveling exhibition for 6-yrs., viewed by over 6-million people.  ~Robert Glenn Ketchum





Friday, June 15, 2018

FISHFARMS: Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #8:
Fish Farms #8:  Being food poisoned is not fun, especially when the bathroom is one that is shared, AND down the hall from your room. Nonetheless, I survive my evening ordeal AND learn something that serves me well throughout my entire life - ALWAYS carry Pepto-Bismol chewable tabs. The next morning I am functional, but their is no word about permission to go to the Volga river farming, and the Moscow aquaculture market is closed, so our group of friends takes Elisabeth and me, sightseeing. Red Square is first on the list of locations to which we all walk. It is one of those days where “the sullen Russian skies go on forever,” so Red Square seems pretty grey, AND it is cold. I do not revisit being sick after breakfast, so by lunch, I am ready to eat again, and also grateful to go inside for awhile where it is warmer. Lunch is great. Very “European,” with no unknown ingredients, and no after effects, either. I remain hopeful being sick was a brief event. As the day wears on, Elisabeth tells me she is concerned that we are not really getting anything accomplished, and that if the Russians do not show us something soon, we would leave for India.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2018, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism Online:
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com

____________________________________________________

Thursday, June 14, 2018

Weekly Post, High and Wild: Three Years of Wandering in the Wind Rivers

High and Wild: Three Years of Wandering in the Wind Rivers
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

After receiving my MFA from CalArts, I was invited by Bill Lund, Sharon Disney’s husband, to come stay at the families' Diamond-D Ranch in Dubois, Wyoming. Bill thought I might like to photograph in the nearby Wind River Mountains, which I did, backpacking through them extensively over the next three summers. Welcome to a world of big granite walls and huge alpine lakes!




Thursday, June 14, 2018

High and Wild:  Three Years of Wandering in the Wind Rivers, #42:
Wind River, #42:  On our first day camping at Pole Creek Lakes, Mike Knowlin and I enjoy the warmth and lack of threatening weather. Re-energizing after the 9-mile backpack through a snowstorm on the hike in, our hours of fishing, swimming, and gawking this day are the perfect recovery response. The Pole Creek Lakes are numerous, and several are large. Their shorelines are granite terraces and peninsulas, occasionally broken by a meadow, and there are numerous shallow bays in which Belle likes to chase the fish. Knowlin and I stroll, snack, and cast our day away. Back in camp for trout dinner, we enjoy a beautiful twilight near our tent site on a small jetty of rock overlooking the lake. Although some clouds have come into the sky, there is no weather build-up, and we hope for another day like this, tomorrow, as we have decided to summit a nearby mountain to have a better look around.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2018, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism Online:
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
____________________________________________________

Weekly Post: Big Mountain and Glacier National Park - Expanding My Winter Consciousness

Big Mountain and Glacier National Park - 
Expanding My Winter Consciousness
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

In the early '70’s, I was doing a lot of winter adventuring with my friends in the Decker Flats Climbing and Frisbee Club, and a client invited me to take pictures at Big Mountain, a ski resort in Montana. Glacier National Park was not far away, so I thought that might be an interesting place to explore in the winter, as well. These two locations added important work to my exhibits and portfolios, and definitely expanded/sobered my winter consciousness.




Thursday, June 14, 2018

Big Mountain and Glacier National Park - Expanding My Winter Consciousness, #46:
Big Mountain, #46:  After indulging the stunning afternoon lightshow on the peaks by lounging on our ski slantboards and having snacks, Robert Tchirkow and I realize we may have lingered too long. The winter day is short and the sun sets quickly. So it does, and we are just barely back in our skis and headed to camp. Fortunately for us the brutal wind has stopped, and it is not snowing at the moment. It is also good that the storm is “warm," so we are not cold, because we are definitely going to be skiing in the twilight, and maybe, the dark. With all of the excitement of the day, we have forgotten the length of the ski from our camp into the canyon. Now that we are heading back, it seems a much greater distance than when we headed in - funny how that happens! When we can finally see our tent in the distance, I feel secure enough to stop once again and look around. The light is gone, and so my color film is useless, but I put in a roll of B&W, and make this image, “McPartland Peak,” which goes on to become one of the 24-images in my portfolio, "WINTERS: 1970-1980.”
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2018, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism Online:
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
____________________________________________________

Wednesday, June 13, 2018

Weekly Post: Adventuring on the Yakutat Forelands - Bowing before St. Elias by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Adventuring on the Yakutat Forelands - Bowing before St. Elias
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

The Yakutat Forelands are where the Tongass rainforest and the Chugach forest to the north meet. It is also home to many large glaciers, a stunning coastline, the huge Alsek-Tatshenshini river, and Icy Bay, which sits at the foot of Mount St. Elias, the greatest vertical rise from sea level in the world. There is a lot of powerful energy out here.



Wednesday, June 13, 2018

Adventuring on the Yakutat Forelands - Bowing before St. Elias, #75:
The Yakutat Forelands, #75:  We are looking down about 800ft. of verticality at the end of our fjord wall hike, and the chocolate waterfall below is raging. It is amazing to me how the waterfall looks more like smoke in this image because of its color. The falling water is mesmerizing, and my fellow camper-kayakers and I sit watching this spectacle for quite awhile. Eventually our ears need some relief from the roar, and we all need to move and become active once again, because we are getting stiff from the cold. Working our way back across the terrace, there is for me a strange “melancholy-of-retreat.” We are now going to leave this most unusual world in which we have been hiking, and since I am VERY sure I will probably never again see anything quite like this, I actually linger and intentionally slow the group down, trying one last time to take it all in while we descend to the boats.

photograph(s) © copyright, Robert Glenn Ketchum, 2018, @RbtGlennKetchum, @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
____________________________________________________

Friday, May 18, 2018

2018 Venice Art Walk Featuring Robert Glenn Ketchum


For more than 20yrs. I have contributed to this event. It is VERY fun!. Because of some significant sales in the past few years, I have been allowed an “oversized” contribution this year, as the committee recognizes my images have amazing detail that is best viewed at a larger scale. “Rivers of Life” is stunning at 40” wide. Come to the Google offices - view all the work being exhibited and auctioned. Eat, drink, be merry, enjoy music, AND bid up my piece. Help support healthcare for all!



Wednesday, April 18, 2018

Remembering Barbara Bush


In 1987, Aperture published my book, 'The Tongass: Alaska’s Vanishing Rain Forest', which was intended to support the proposed Tongass Timber Reform Act. In the ensuing years, I spent much time in DC, exhibiting, lecturing, and lobbying on behalf of the bill’s passage. The most significant timber reform legislation in American history passed in 1990, and was signed into law by President George H.W. Bush. He then invited me to the White House in 1991 to acknowledge my contributions to the effort. For the photo-op, I was ushered into a room to find both he and Barbara awaiting me. We “socialized” while the pictures were being taken, and even in such a brief period, I was struck by Barbara’s presence. The president and I exchanged formalities, and he made sure I knew he had seen the book and knew my story, as I would have expected on this occasion. Barbara, however, was like speaking with my mother, in spite of the fact I am sporting a mohawk, a long ponytail, and a diamond-stud earring, and I am sure she was glad I was not her son. Nonetheless, she wanted to know if I was married, had kids, took them with me, were my adventures scary, did I enjoy sleeping in tents - you know, mom stuff - not a word about the politics of the situation. I have never had anyone make me feel some comfortable, in an otherwise “stiff” situation, so thank you Barbara Bush for meeting with me that day as well, and may you rest in peace.

To further this story a bit, I brought along my newest Aperture book, Overlooked In America: The Success and Failure of Federal Land Management which I gave to the President during the photo-op. Given the title of the book, and the nature of my politics, the President smiled broadly for a picture holding the book, and then put it aside. After speaking with me for awhile, Barbara turned and picked it up, opening it and leafing through the pages, complimenting my pictures and asking about their locations. She was a skillful weaving of necessary Washington formality, and honest, human interest.

Thursday, September 21, 2017

H.R. 232, 115th Congress, 1st Session

"A CALL TO ACTION: 115th Congressional Assault on The Tongass National Forest", The Boat Company

A CALL TO ACTION: 115th Congressional Assault on The Tongass National Forest

Reprinted with permission from Hunter H. McIntosh, President, The Boat Company

We are living in a time of unprecedented attacks on both public lands and waters, and the agencies that protect them. Without action on the part of all Americans, Republican and Democrat, we stand to lose much of the conservation legacy that has been achieved over the 38 years since The Boat Company was created, not just in Southeast Alaska, but everywhere. And it is no coincidence that this legislation is all coming out rapid fire – the flood of new legislation, not seen in six years, is designed to make it more difficult to meaningfully respond to or organize around any one proposed law.

Monday, September 18, 2017

A Tale of Two Futures: Alaskan Wild Salmon vs. the Pebble Mine by Joel Reynolds, NRDC

A Tale of Two Futures: Alaskan Wild Salmon vs. the Pebble Mine

by Joel Reynolds, Western Director, Senior Attorney, Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC)
Reprinted with permission by the Author.
Originally published on Huffington Post.

For anyone still unclear about the irreconcilable disconnect between the rich heritage of Alaskans and the overriding financial self-interest of The Pebble Partnership, it was on stunning display in Bristol Bay’s wild salmon fishery this summer.

Wednesday, September 13, 2017

"A CALL TO ACTION: 115th Congressional Assault on The Tongass National Forest", The Boat Company

A CALL TO ACTION: 115th Congressional Assault on The Tongass National Forest

Reprinted with permission from Hunter H. McIntosh, President, The Boat Company

We are living in a time of unprecedented attacks on both public lands and waters, and the agencies that protect them. Without action on the part of all Americans, Republican and Democrat, we stand to lose much of the conservation legacy that has been achieved over the 38 years since The Boat Company was created, not just in Southeast Alaska, but everywhere. And it is no coincidence that this legislation is all coming out rapid fire – the flood of new legislation, not seen in six years, is designed to make it more difficult to meaningfully respond to or organize around any one proposed law.

Wednesday, September 6, 2017

"A CALL TO ACTION: 115th Congressional Assault on The Tongass National Forest", The Boat Company

A CALL TO ACTION: 115th Congressional Assault on The Tongass National Forest

Reprinted with permission from Hunter H. McIntosh, President, The Boat Company

We are living in a time of unprecedented attacks on both public lands and waters, and the agencies that protect them. Without action on the part of all Americans, Republican and Democrat, we stand to lose much of the conservation legacy that has been achieved over the 38 years since The Boat Company was created, not just in Southeast Alaska, but everywhere. And it is no coincidence that this legislation is all coming out rapid fire – the flood of new legislation, not seen in six years, is designed to make it more difficult to meaningfully respond to or organize around any one proposed law.

Orvis Supports No Pebble Mine

icon icon