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Wednesday, April 26, 2017

Weekly Post: Adventuring on the Yakutat Forelands - Bowing before St. Elias by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Adventuring on the Yakutat Forelands - Bowing before St. Elias
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

The Yakutat Forelands are where the Tongass rainforest and the Chugach forest to the north meet. It is also home to many large glaciers, a stunning coastline, the huge Alsek-Tatshenshini river, and Icy Bay, which sits at the foot of Mount St. Elias, the greatest vertical rise from sea level in the world. There is a lot of powerful energy out here.




Wednesday, April 26, 2017

Adventuring on the Yakutat Forelands - Bowing before St. Elias, #16:
The Yakutat Forelands, #16:  We have found a virtual staircase leading up through a series of rock ledges. With every step we gain dramatic elevation AND the vegetations starts to change. If you follow this blog, you may have seen the previous posts in which we probed the bluffs looking for a way up into the meadows above, only to no avail. Perhaps you were thinking we should plunge in and start scrambling, but now you have this perspective, study the view. Those bluffs are an impenetrable thicket, and in many places, the faces are sheer, completely vertical. Without this amazing subtle trail our pilot revealed to us, we would never have made this ascent. The view is spectacular. We can see the expanse of the river we have been following, AND off to the right, our cabin sits at the foot of those distant hills. We still have some way to scramble up before we get to the top of our staircase and a light rain is once again beginning to fall, so we press on to see where this is going to lead us.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Weekly Post:, ARCTIC: At the Cutting Edge of Climate Change

ARCTIC:  At the Cutting Edge of Climate Change
by Robert Glenn Ketchum



In 1993, I began traveling to the Arctic. I have been across The Northwest Passage by yacht; to the North Pole twice; to little-visited Russian islands; and aboard research vessels in Greenland, Labrador, Newfoundland, and Baffin Island, taking the opportunity to visit Iqualuit, the capital of Nunavut, the recently created Inuit nation and territories.




Wednesday, April 26, 2017

ARCTIC:  At the Cutting Edge of Climate Change, #37:
ARCTIC, #37:  With customs inspections behind us, and a day of meeting people and seeing places nearing an end, talk at the dinner table turns to what we are planning for the following day. We anticipate having a relatively ice-free run for awhile because we will be protected from polar floes by Victoria Island, which you can see occupies most of the upper-right in this map and is one of the largest islands in the world. Far to the left on the map, you can see the meanders of the Mackenzie River system, and at the mouth of the bay where the river enters the sea, is Tuktoyaktuk, our current position. We will leave here in the morning, heading east (to the right), around the peninsula of land, and hugging the lower coastline, we will travel through the channel below Victoria Island, heading for the village of Cambridge Bay, the last village designated to the far left on this map. This is a considerable distance and the run will take several days, so for the moment, Bruce Brophy, the ice pilot we have brought aboard, can have a short “vacation” before he has to go to work. AFTER Cambridge Bay, we expect conditions to become far more difficult and he will have a chance to us his skills. However, Bill Simon also has one more trick up his sleeve to help this journey, and we will make that connection after Cambridge Bay.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Tuesday, April 25, 2017

Weekly Post: THE TONGASS: Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees by Robert Glenn Ketchum

THE TONGASS:  Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees
by Robert Glenn Ketchum
In 1985, I began a 2-year commission to explore the Tongass rainforest, the largest forest in the United States Forest Service (USFS) system AND the largest temperate rainforest in the world. It was a unique, old-growth environment under siege from industrial logging. The resulting investigative book I published helped to pass the Tongass Timber Reform Bill, protect 1,000,000 acres of old-growth, and create 11 new wilderness areas. This is the story of how that was achieved.




Tuesday, April 25, 2017

THE TONGASS:  Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees, #35:
THE TONGASS, #35:  In order to make the shot of people fishing the falls in the previous post, I have taken one of the skiffs from “Observer” and a crew member who is helping to position our boat in the strong current flowing out of the waterfall. Staying in position and staying dry are futile tasks, but we motor and angle, then I wipe and shoot, and it seems to get the job done. After about 1/2 hour of this, everyone is soaked, including those who are fishing, and they reel in their lines and retire to the hot tubs on shore. I head back to our boat for some dry clothes and a camera check, which I am barely completing when we are clearly buzzed by a plane.When I emerge on deck to see this, I am thinking, “Cool, maybe he will land and I will get a shot of that.” The plane heads down bay for several hundred yards, then swings abruptly around and drops slowly out of the sky onto the water, coming right at us. Having NOT been around small planes much, and floatplanes, in particular, I am fascinated to see this happening and do get some shots. The floatplane motors up fairly close to our boat in the bay, and then one of our crew turns to ME and asks if I have my film and cameras ready because this plane has come to take ME flightseeing above Baranof Island. WHAT? To further my project, all involved think I need to have an aerial view of this to really begin to understand the terrain of these islands, and SO, I guess I am going flying in a small plane.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Weekly Post: NO PEBBLE MINE: Pictures from Ground Zero by Robert Glenn Ketchum

NO PEBBLE MINE Pictures from Ground Zero 
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Thank you to the EPA for recognizing the value of the Bristol Bay fishery. 
NOW, what can we do to protect this habitat further? 
Mission: To protect the national parks and national refuges of southwest Alaska, 
and the Bristol Bay fishery from the development of the Pebble mine, and other commercial risks.




Tuesday, April 25, 2017 


NO PEBBLE MINE #241, Pictures from Ground Zero:  
NO PEBBLE MINE #241: I suspect that at one point glaciers virtually covered the Wood Mountains. That would take quite an accumulation of snow and ice which now in a warmer climate seems unimaginable, and yet, this image was made in mid-July, and there is still a lot of snow on the ground, even at lower elevation. As you will see in the posts to follow, what may look like green foothills in this shot, are actually substantial summits, but there is very little to reference for scale, so it is hard to understand how big this landscape is. As our flight crosses over ridgelines and opens up the valleys and vistas, you will have a better sense of it, but remember how big those lakes are that we have previously visited. They were ALL carved deeply by glaciers that came down out of this range and cut into the floor of the tundra plane. What is also clear is that all of those lakes and the impenetrably dense vegetation on these slopes is fed by this nearly year-long presence of melting snow and rain. It is beautiful to see from the air, but it probably would not be much fun on foot.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd @NRDC @OrvisFlyFishing #NoPebbleMine #LittleBearProd

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Monday, April 24, 2017

Weekly Post: The Higher You Get, The Higher You Get by Robert Glenn Ketchum

by Robert Glenn Ketchum


Growing up my parents had a home near Sun Valley, Idaho. It was there that I learned to ski. Over many years I befriended members of the Decker Flats Climbing and Frisbee Club, with whom I had both life, and art-forming outdoor experiences. I had my camera, and these are my adventures.




Monday, April 24, 2017

The Higher You Get, The Higher You Get - Sun Valley and the DFC&FC, #51:
THE HIGHER YOU GET, THE HIGHER YOU GET, #51:  There is yet one more “character” to introduce, another DFC&FC colleague, but to set the stage properly we must return to the Sawtooths. Like Redfish Lake (post #36), this is one of the lower, larger lakes that are part of the range - this is Pettit. Pettit is about 1-1/2 miles across, at the end of which is a rising valley. The tallest of the visible summits in this image is Parks Peak (10,200’). It is quite a view and quite a basin. At this time, Pettit not only hosts US Forest Service campgrounds, but it also has private residences that hold “grandfathered” leases (that I think have now expired). One of those grandfathered “cabins-by-the-lake” belongs to Dr. George Saviers, who is noted as Hemingway’s personal doctor, but who also was part of the excellent medical group that serves the athletes and injuries of Sun Valley. Doc has several sons, and of them, Joe, is a classmate of Gordon Williams and Chris Puchner, AND a contributor to the concept of the DFC&FC. Part of that time we spend “conceptualizing” is at Doc’s cabin on Pettit Lake. Of course it is nice in the summer when it is warm and you can swim in the lake, but that is when everyone wants to be there. WE, of the DFC&FC thought it was also a great place to go in the winter when no one was around and the Sawtooths were showing off their rugged walls and summits through layers of deep (skiable) snow! For me as a young photographer, this was a VERY inspiring retreat.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Weekly Post: STONED IMMACULATE: A Trip in the Desert by Robert Glenn Ketchum

STONED IMMACULATE:  A Trip in the Desert
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

As a young photographer, two places I “discovered” by chance greatly influenced both my photographic vision and my personal relationship with the greater planet. A previous blog, LIMEKILN, is the story of the first location. THIS is the second location which I discovered because my car broke down. As Jim Morrison/The Doors wrote, “Out here we is stoned Immaculate!"



Monday, April 24, 2017


Stoned Immaculate, #25:
Immaculate, #25:  As the heat of the day increases, the color-banded, morphing walls cause my pace of progress to decrease. For awhile I shelter in the shadow of an amazing overhang that I do not “notice” when I first sit down. Then as my eyes adjust to the shade, the colors on the walls glow to life. By the time I finish groveling around with my camera, the sun has shifted in the slot, and I proceed into yet another very narrow wash between two gigantic domes. One of them is blindingly illuminated by the direct sun. Then I realize the wall of the second dome, which I am standing next to, is also brightly illuminated by the radiant light REFLECTED off of its neighbor. It is a HUGE wall - color-banded, fractured - a gigantic abstract canvas if ever there was one. I cannot back up far enough to take it all in, so I use my widest lens and get what I can. Of several shots, this one best suggests scale to me because of the large bush, then other times I think it tells too much. This subtle line between description and abstraction sticks in my mind throughout the day, and as I continue up the wash. This pathway I have chosen to follow presents me with some pretty surprising challenges as to where that line gets drawn. See what you think in the next few posts.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Saturday, April 22, 2017

Venice Art Walk 2017

“Peaking in My Butterfly Garden” 2017*


Once again it is time for the Venice ARTwalk, one of the truly fun all-weekend parties in Los Angeles. Come see great art displayed at the Google headquarters and buy something at the auction to support the Venice Family Clinic. I always create a UNIQUE piece for this event, so please join us and bid on it. At 30” wide, my contribution this year: “Peaking in My Butterfly Garden”
For more info:
https://theveniceartwalk.org



Venice Art Walk 2017

May 21, 2017
12pm-6pm
340 Main Street
Venice, California


*photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com

Friday, April 21, 2017

Weekly Post: My Life in the Garden of Eden by Robert Glenn Ketchum

My Life in the Garden of Eden
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

As part of paying the bills in my professional career, I photographed a number of significant gardens. I helped create several pretty amazing ones as well. Some of these pictures have been published in various books, but most have never been seen. In this blog, I will show you all my best garden images AND discuss garden design.




Friday, April 21, 2017
My Life in the Garden of Eden, #42:
Garden, #42:  This is the more finished part of my new garden, and the spring rains have brought the islands of planting alive. As you see, I have mixed pots and ground plantings in clusters that allow viewing and access from 360-degrees. This post, however, is really about the plant blooming those lavender, cone-shaped flowers in the upper left - a Pride of Madeira. This is a beautiful flowering plant as you can see. It is also drought tolerant. In California, it is considered an invasive species in the wild. In my garden it will just try to take over. MORE importantly, there are few other plants I know that attract bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds like this one does. It brings the entire garden to life. Things are literally, buzzing! If you are a insect biologist and reading this, perhaps you can help me here. One other element is attracted to this plant, and I can only describe it as a “crazy moth.” It is seldom around during the day, and if they are here at night I do not see them, but for about 3hrs. every morning, several of them arrive in the yard. They do not often land, but rather fly around VERY fast in crazy patterns that seem to have little meaning. Occasionally they chase each, but mostly they just rocket around nearly missing things, and they are as fast as hummingbirds. I think they are moths because I saw one dive into a planter, and when I investigated it looked moth-like with camouflage wing colors. Any ideas?
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Weekly Post: The Daze of My Life: Robert Glenn Ketchum, An Autobiography


Biographies are studies of someone's life based on cumulative research. Good ones may reveal something, but probably barely scratch the surface of what actually went on. The internet is allowing me to do something VERY different. 
~Robert Glenn Ketchum



Friday, April 21, 2017

The Daze of My Life:  Robert Glenn Ketchum, An Autobiography #42:
Daze, #42:  After graduation from UCLA, I move to Sun Valley, Idaho to begin my career as a practicing photographer. During the first fall-winter, I live in the Bald Mountain Hot Springs Motel, teach photography classes out of my apartment and run the light show for the Boiler Room, a nightclub attached to the Lodge at Sun Valley. Through my photography classes, I am fortunate enough to meet prominent resident, Glenn Cooper, who is in the process of founding the Sun Valley Creative Arts Center, and she asks if I would like to teach a workshop under their auspices in the following summer. It sounds good to me, so I agree. I also ask if the teachers might have housing provided and so “friends” of the SVCAC help me find living accommodations, and I end up ensconced in a 4-bedroom duplex at the end of Warm Springs Road that is built into the hillside and looks directly at the Lower Warm Springs ski run. “Off” season I commute to Santa Barbara for classes at Brooks Institute and the picture in the previous post was a result of fulfilling an assignment for Brooks during a visit to the valley. Once summer starts, I return to Idaho, to teach workshops for the SVCAC. They are very popular AND full, so I am also able to employ other friends to teach additional classes. The rental house fills with 3 teachers and the owner’s son next door, then Gordon Williams and Chris Puchner, my colleagues from the Decker Flats Climbing and Frisbee Club, show up and start to hang around. Friends have friends, dogs, AND girlfriends, so it is quite a summer. Many pictures important to my emerging career are made. I learn to camp, backpack, and begin skiing backcountry, taking my camera to some VERY different parts of the landscape. Above you see: THE house from which we all hold court; the Chevy Camaro I pretend is really a 4-wheel drive vehicle; and Shelley Selover, my girlfriend at the time, is visiting from LA to enjoy hiking in the mountains (not quite sure what she thought of the somewhat looney household - LOL!)
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Friday, April 7, 2017

Outdoor Photographer, "Alaskan Legacy. How Robert Glenn Ketchum Became a Leading Advocate for the Preservation of Southwest Alaska’s Ecosystems and Economies" By Wes Pitts


How Robert Glenn Ketchum became a leading advocate for the preservation of Southwest Alaska’s ecosystems and economies

By Wes Pitts / Photography By Robert Glenn Ketchum | April 5, 2017

The approximate location of the proposed Pebble mine. If it were to be built, this view would be an industrialized hole in the ground over two miles across and 2,000 feet deep.
Few outsiders know Southwest Alaska as intimately as Robert Glenn Ketchum. Remote and vast, the region has limited roadways, requiring planes and boats to explore. It’s also home to several national and state parks, wildlife reserves, complex ecosystems and the largest salmon fishery in the world, Bristol Bay, which supplies half of the global sockeye salmon catch.

Orvis Supports No Pebble Mine

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