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Thursday, August 17, 2017

Weekly Post: Big Mountain and Glacier National Park - Expanding My Winter Consciousness

Big Mountain and Glacier National Park - 
Expanding My Winter Consciousness
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

In the early '70’s, I was doing a lot of winter adventuring with my friends in the Decker Flats Climbing and Frisbee Club, and a client invited me to take pictures at Big Mountain, a ski resort in Montana. Glacier National Park was not far away, so I thought that might be an interesting place to explore in the winter, as well. These two locations added important work to my exhibits and portfolios, and definitely expanded/sobered my winter consciousness.




Thursday, August 17, 2017

Big Mountain and Glacier National Park - Expanding My Winter Consciousness, #3:
Big Mountain, #3: Besides a glowing fall, Big Mountain, Whitefish Lake, and the Flathead Valley have water, water EVERYWHERE! Streams, lakes, big rivers, AND it comes out of the sky quite a lot, as well. The work I am doing for realtor/developer, Tom Curran, is going well and the terrain is navigable enough to allow me to drag my 4x5 view camera most places. The few times I actually shoot with my 35mm cameras on Big Mountain property, are when I need longer, telephoto views. I stay for two weeks to watch the end of the fall season and the first snows that signal the beginning of winter. I feel I am having a great shoot with most of what will appeal to Tom accomplished with the big camera. As my visit nears an end, I have one more objective while I am in the valley, and that is to visit Glacier National Park. Glacier is part of the Continental Divide and is also on the border with Canada. There is actually a Canadian “side” to the park that you reach by driving the Going-to-the-Sun Road through the center of the park. I want to do this before it closes for winter, so I can get some sense of the park because, besides returning in the winter to continue my work on the Big Mountain ski area, I am hoping I might discover some opportunities for good stories to contribute to the formative POWDER magazine with whom I have just started working. In the winter, the backside of Big Mountain turns into something called the “Fantasy Forest,” and a ski trip into Glacier might also be possible, so that is what I want scout.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism Online:
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Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Weekly Post: Adventuring on the Yakutat Forelands - Bowing before St. Elias by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Adventuring on the Yakutat Forelands - Bowing before St. Elias
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

The Yakutat Forelands are where the Tongass rainforest and the Chugach forest to the north meet. It is also home to many large glaciers, a stunning coastline, the huge Alsek-Tatshenshini river, and Icy Bay, which sits at the foot of Mount St. Elias, the greatest vertical rise from sea level in the world. There is a lot of powerful energy out here.




Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Adventuring on the Yakutat Forelands - Bowing before St. Elias, #32:
The Yakutat Forelands, #32: As the last light fades and the air grows colder, we all realize what a workout the day has been because we are stiff from sitting, AND we still have one more “adventure” before we can return to the cabin - we have to get down the hill to it in the darkening twilight. I would like to thank Carey, for this picture of me taking one last look. As we are putting on our gear for the descent, I would also like to note and thank, Patagonia who supplied me with much of the “new”gear I am sporting. The blue fleece is a 1st generation; the red rain pants, are the 2nd generation of that gear; and the striped, capilene, expedition, zipper-T-neck has just been introduced, and is my FAVORITE piece of equipment. In Alaska, especially, it stays light and warm when wet, it is self-drying, and it easily ventilates to adjust to activity. Just FYI, the beaded belt holds a lens and case, and the yellow bandana is tied to the drawstring of my rainpants, so I can wipe my cameras off easily. Another sign of the times lies just above the bandana on my head. I am sporting a curly-top mohawk. I am shaved shear, on the sides, but it is REALLY long on top and in back. For those who mock we with curly hair, THIS is excellent mosquito/biting fly protection - LOL.
photograph(s) © copyright, Carey D. Peterson, 2017, @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Weekly Post:, ARCTIC: At the Cutting Edge of Climate Change

ARCTIC:  At the Cutting Edge of Climate Change
by Robert Glenn Ketchum



In 1993, I began traveling to the Arctic. I have been across The Northwest Passage by yacht; to the North Pole twice; to little-visited Russian islands; and aboard research vessels in Greenland, Labrador, Newfoundland, and Baffin Island, taking the opportunity to visit Iqualuit, the capital of Nunavut, the recently created Inuit nation and territories.













Wednesday, August 16, 2017

ARCTIC:  At the Cutting Edge of Climate Change, #53:
ARCTIC, #53: As the pilot is dining with staff in the galley, after the incredible sky-show-sunset, I wander down to have a beer with all of them and ask about the interesting repair on the bubble of his helicopter that seems to be making Bill Simon a bit nervous. The pilot tells me that the damage was done by someone who was careless with a fork-loader, and ran into his parked chopper, putting a big crack in the bubble near the bottom, left-side. This pilot makes most of his money flying assay samples from a mine in Yellowknife, so he does not have the income to casually replace the bubble, but he felt certain he had repaired it using “Iniut skills.” Working with some Native friends, he acquired reindeer sinew - the fiber in muscle meat that Natives use to build sleds and other things - and using a drill to make small holes, created a “sewn” system of lashes and stitches to bind the crack in the bubble closed. It sounded interesting to me, and when I repeat what I have learned to John Bockstoce, he comments that the sinew is stronger than any glue could ever be, and he has no apprehensions about the repair. Bill, however, is still pretty skeptical, so he suggests that since John and I are fine with it, we should be the first to go flying. John and I are good with that, but first Gjoa Haven. The sunset of the night before predicted weather was headed our way, and the color of the morning sky makes it clear that weather has arrived. It looks like our visit to the village is going to be a wet one.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Weekly Post: THE TONGASS: Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees by Robert Glenn Ketchum

THE TONGASS:  Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees
by Robert Glenn Ketchum
In 1985, I began a 2-year commission to explore the Tongass rainforest, the largest forest in the United States Forest Service (USFS) system AND the largest temperate rainforest in the world. It was a unique, old-growth environment under siege from industrial logging. The resulting investigative book I published helped to pass the Tongass Timber Reform Bill, protect 1,000,000 acres of old-growth, and create 11 new wilderness areas. This is the story of how that was achieved.





Tuesday, August 15, 2017

THE TONGASS:  Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees, #51:
THE TONGASS, #51: The entrance to Gut Bay is similar to Deep Bay in that it is a deep cut gorge, rather than a sprawling river delta. The walls here are closer and steeper than those in Deep Bay, and they are even more vegetated. The Tongass rainforest has many micro-niches, and rainfall amounts can vary considerably from place to place, so I presume Gut Bay must be in a wet zone because it appears so lush. Our captain points out that both of these bays that we have visited are extremely deep water, so at some point in the history of Baranof, there was some very dramatic glaciation that has since retreated leaving these fjords. In some of the bays we will visit, there is the opportunity to go ashore and scramble around, but when there is this much growth on the walls, most of the exploring involves kayaks and shoreline walks. The forest is nearly impenetrable. The eagles and fish are everywhere, though!
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Weekly Post: NO PEBBLE MINE: Pictures from Ground Zero by Robert Glenn Ketchum

NO PEBBLE MINE Pictures from Ground Zero 
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Thank you to the EPA for recognizing the value of the Bristol Bay fishery. 
NOW, what can we do to protect this habitat further? 
Mission: To protect the national parks and national refuges of southwest Alaska, 
and the Bristol Bay fishery from the development of the Pebble mine, and other commercial risks.




Tuesday, August 15, 2017 

NO PEBBLE MINE #257, Pictures from Ground Zero:  
NO PEBBLE MINE #257:  If you study the distant sky of the previous post, you can see the increasing low clouds of weather moving in. As we fly deeper into the peaks and valleys of the park, that weather increases, but we are not experiencing wind turbulence or loss of visibility, so we continue to explore. There are a few rock faces showing here and there, and once in awhile I see treetops, but for the most part, this is a white world, and everything else is buried. Just past the point of this image, we fly into a open vista that offers views of some significant summits, but the pilot does not like the look of the weather now pouring over the ridges, and he says we need to swing back toward the lodge. He says we do have time to see more of the park, we just need to leave the peak section until all of this passes.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd @NRDC @OrvisFlyFishing #NoPebbleMine #LittleBearProd


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Monday, August 14, 2017

Weekly Post: The Higher You Get, The Higher You Get by Robert Glenn Ketchum

by Robert Glenn Ketchum


Growing up my parents had a home near Sun Valley, Idaho. It was there that I learned to ski. Over many years I befriended members of the Decker Flats Climbing and Frisbee Club, with whom I had both life, and art-forming outdoor experiences. I had my camera, and these are my adventures.







Monday, August 14, 2017

The Higher You Get, The Higher You Get - Sun Valley and the DFC&FC, #67:
THE HIGHER YOU GET, THE HIGHER YOU GET, #67:  With our daypacks full of plastic, cans, and other trash, we turn ourselves back toward Pioneer Cabin and begin to walk down-basin. As we stroll, the sky brightens and the clouds begin to lift. By the time we reach the dome at the foot of Handwerk Peak, we can actually see blue, and sun has begun to warm the day a bit even though it is getting late. Knowing a slog up the scree gullies we came down will be miserable, we decide to drop lower in this valley to the more forested slope below the cabin, which should be easier to scramble up. As we round the base of Hendwerk, clouds lift off 11,700ft., Duncan Ridge, which comes fully into view. This is a BIG, STEEP wall, whose ruggedness is now even more accentuated by the light dusting of snow, and in the dazzling sunlight, it is breathtaking. We need to keep moving so that we can ascend to the cabin before dark, thus I am quick to snap this shot off. At the time, this was nothing more than a document, but seeing Duncan Ridge sent a primal chill up my spine because I could sense its power and scale. As fate would have it, in just a few months I would be back at Pioneer Cabin in the middle of winter, and this time I would SEE Duncan Ridge in ALL of its raging glory.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Weekly Post: STONED IMMACULATE: A Trip in the Desert by Robert Glenn Ketchum

STONED IMMACULATE:  A Trip in the Desert
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

As a young photographer, two places I “discovered” by chance greatly influenced both my photographic vision and my personal relationship with the greater planet. A previous blog, LIMEKILN, is the story of the first location. THIS is the second location which I discovered because my car broke down. As Jim Morrison/The Doors wrote, “Out here we is stoned Immaculate!"








Monday, August 14, 2017

Stoned Immaculate, #41:
Immaculate, #41: Revisiting this unusual place in the desert frequently throughout the 70’s with my 35mm cameras, serves to fine tune my sense of the abstract and greatly enhance my understanding of color and light. The smaller cameras and film do not afford me the technical quality I want to make exceptionally large prints, but they do allow me to use my days taking pictures like a sketchbook. Easy to hike with in the rugged, often hot conditions, I can also maneuver with them to create some very successful POVs. With each return, my cerebral mapping grows and I recognize certain specific locations, often re-photographing them, and then I am able to see how they change from one visit to another, or from one circumstance of lighting to another. My growing library informs my vision, making each successive visit more insightful, more attuned. Now if I could only make bigger prints!
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Orvis Supports No Pebble Mine

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