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Monday, December 9, 2019

Weekly Post, High and Wild: Three Years of Wandering in the Wind Rivers

High and Wild: Three Years of Wandering in the Wind Rivers
by Robert Glenn Ketchum



After receiving my MFA from CalArts, I was invited by Bill Lund, Sharon Disney’s husband, to come stay at the families' Diamond-D Ranch in Dubois, Wyoming. Bill thought I might like to photograph in the nearby Wind River Mountains, which I did, backpacking through them extensively over the next three summers. Welcome to a world of big granite walls and huge alpine lakes!
~Robert Glenn Ketchum




Monday, December 9, 2019
High and Wild:  Three Years of Wandering in the Wind Rivers, #120: Wind River, #120: As the stream from the small lake beneath East Temple Peak winds its way into Deep Lake, it fans out across the slabs we walk upon, and winds around the random boulders, creating some beautiful shallow pools, which my black lab, Belle Star, takes every opportunity to walk through. At the POV above, I am looking directly across the significant expanse of Deep Lake, and directly into the very distant Cirque of Towers. It is a stunning view of a VERY granite world, which we are in the heart of. The pointed summit to the left is War Bonnet Peak at 12,487ft., astride the Continental Divide, and just to the right is the distinctive flat-topped, cone-shaped, Pingora, an amazing sculpture of sheer granite walls. Interestingly, there may be dozens of campers-climbers residing in that basin at this moment, but there is NO ONE where we are, and the walls surrounding us are equally impressive. We feel so lucky to have it all to ourselves, and to have found a discreet place to hide in a tree garden, in case weird weather decides to roll through. So far, our day has been mostly clear, but it has also been hot, and as the afternoon wears on, some puffy clouds drift in from the west. Our route back to camp will take us onto the dome on the left, and as the afternoon is wearing on, it is time for us to get moving.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2019, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd


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Weekly Post: The Higher You Get, The Higher You Get by Robert Glenn Ketchum

by Robert Glenn Ketchum


Growing up my parents had a home near Sun Valley, Idaho. It was there that I learned to ski. Over many years I befriended members of the Decker Flats Climbing and Frisbee Club, with whom I had both life, and art-forming outdoor experiences. I had my camera, and these are my adventures. Enjoy!!  
~Robert Glenn Ketchum



Monday, December 92019

The Higher You Get, The Higher You Get - Sun Valley and the DFC&FC, #188: DFCFC, #188: After a dazzling night in camp, with a radiant sunset and sky show (last post), we all sleep well, and awaken to a, so far, benign weather system still streaming overhead, but neither raining or snowing. It is windy and cold, but “refreshing,” and it seems we might have a decent day to hike and explore. While breakfast gets organized, my DFC&FC friend, Gordon Williams, wants to go back to the base of Haystack Mountain, where we visited last night, to once again survey the sheer granite face, and dramatic terraces of little trees. It is quite close by our camp, so while our partners start a fire, and brew some hot liquids, Gordon and I take a morning ramble through the rocks. Haystack is not so much of a peak, but rather, a broad, rounded granite dome. However, from this angle, it certainly looks pointy. Having camped in this basin before, Vicki and I know that you can ascend a considerable part of the left shoulder (in this picture) without encountering anything technical, and the view is amazing, so I suggest that is what we should do for our first day of exploration, and Gordon agrees that sounds like a fine idea. The clouds are high, and thin, and do not appear to threaten us, if we choose to climb higher, so back in camp, with food warming us, we all prep our day daypacks, and prepare to go adventuring, agreeing that, “The Higher You Get, The Higher You Get."

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2019, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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Friday, December 6, 2019

The Daze of My Life: Robert Glenn Ketchum, An Autobiography

The Daze of My Life:  Robert Glenn Ketchum, An Autobiography


Biographies are studies of someone's life based on cumulative research. Good ones may reveal something, but probably barely scratch the surface of what actually went on. The internet is allowing me to do something VERY different. 
~Robert Glenn Ketchum




Friday, December 6, 2019

The Daze of My Life:  Robert Glenn Ketchum, An Autobiography #177: Daze, #177: In 1987, Aperture publishes, The Tongass: Alaska’s Vanishing Rain Forest. This is a HUGE moment for my wife, and co-author, Carey, and me. First, it caps two years of work in the field, and another 6-months of in-depth research, interviews, and endless writing-editing-re-writing. It also greatly advances my maturity in book publishing. Michael Hoffman, the CEO of Aperture, really wanted to do a picture book about the Inside Passage, and feared possible reprisal from politicians, corporations, and donors, for the extreme criticism our text leveled at the US Forest Service, and Congress’s management of the Tongass. Similarly, he was VERY concerned about the inclusion of the clearcut pictures, and the purloined maps that revealed road planning that the USFS denied they were doing. He also did not want the title of the book to be “The Tongass,” because he felt no one knew what that was. We remained adamant, as did our project funders, the Lila Acheson Funds, and the McIntosh Foundation, and I openly argued with him that the reason we WOULD call it “The Tongass” was because he was right - no one knew what “the Tongass" was, and WE were going to bring that knowledge into the public consciousness. Eventually, he relented. As importantly, I had expressed my disapproval of what I thought was mediocre color printing on my first Aperture book, The Hudson River and the Highlands, and I wanted to go “on press” to supervise the color printing on this one. I got my wish, and was allowed to do so. This introduced me to Steve Baron, Aperture’s press master, with whom I struck up a life-long friendship, and with whom I stood side-by-side while printing my next six books. With the assistance of the McIntosh Foundation, and the Natural Resources Defense Council, I also went to Washington, DC, to participate in handing out the book to the entire Congress, where I learned to walk the halls of the House and Senate, and promote the issues of the book to key legislators. One of those was Senator William Proxmire from Wisconsin. Proxmire had power, and powerful friends, AND he was a PROPONENT of protecting the Tongass, something he would push forward in a big way in the coming years. I would be involved with that push, and you will read about that later in this blog, so stay tuned!
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2019 
@RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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Weekly Post, Late Fall High in the Sawtooths by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Late Fall High in the Sawtooths
by Robert Glenn Ketchum



My partner, Vicki Golden, and I, have come to love backpacking in late fall. Although we risk getting snowed upon, most of the bugs, and virtually all of the people are gone. This is our last camping trip together, and the last time I ever camped in the Sawtooths. This is a short blog to say goodbye to both.  
~Robert Glenn Ketchum




Friday, December 6, 2019

High in the Sawtooths, #13:
Sawtooths #13:  Up, up, and away! My partner, Vicki Golden, my black lab, Belle Star, and I, have launched ourselves (to say the least). Following our breakfast in a camp surrounded by glowing Twin Lakes meadows, we have traversed the fall spectacle around the lakes, and now we are practicing the DFC&FC motto, “The Higher You Get, The Higher You Get.” Our climb is non-technical, and actually, pretty boulder-to-boulder, terrace-to-terrace, simple. But, it is breathtaking in many ways - the view, and our lungs burn with the gain in altitude. Of course, that is easily addressed by moving slowly, and stopping all the time to take in the view, and have some water and snacks. At this point (above) we are well into the limber pine, garden benches, as you can see, and the lake is like a blue jewel below. However, we are only about 1/4 of how high we will ultimately get, and things are just starting to get real wiggly. The pine terraces are radiant, and the tree trunks seem alive with their twisted, weather-aged wood, so full of texture. This is my favorite alpine environment, and there is much more well above us, so, Excelsior! Onward, and ever upward. Just getting higher in the Sawtooths.

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2019, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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Thursday, December 5, 2019

Welcome to Hotel California: Some Pictures from My Backyard by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Welcome To Hotel California:  Some Pictures From My Backyard
by Robert Glenn Ketchum



I was born, and grew up in Los Angeles. As my professional career developed, I traveled around the world working on various commissions, but seldom had opportunities to work in California. Nonetheless, I always came back “home,” and when there, I occasionally took pictures. For ten years I also taught a photography workshop on the Mendocino coast that provided some great visual moments as well. There is no “project” unifying these images, they are just my way of showing, “You can check out any time you like, but you can never leave.”   ~Robert Glenn Ketchum




Thursday, December 5, 2019

Hotel California, #15:
California #15:  Early morning aglow, Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park.

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2019, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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Weekly Post, SUNDANCE: Artist-In-Residence by Robert Glenn Ketchum

SUNDANCE:  Artist In Residence
by Robert Glenn Ketchum



From 1987-1989, Robert Redford invited me to become the first visual Artist-In-Residence at his newly established Sundance Institute, part of the community he was building around his recently purchased ski resort in Utah. The residency provided me with subject matter that produced some of the most significant images of my career, but importantly, it also afforded me my first aerial work, a platform that would become increasingly important throughout my life. A limited amount of these images were ever published, and NONE of the aerials ever were. The best will now appear, please enjoy!  ~Robert Glenn Ketchum





Thursday, December 5, 2019

SUNDANCE: Artist In Residence, #73:
Sundance #73:  At this point in my Sundance Artist-In-Residence blog, I have described the resort of the surrounding varied environments in depth, and I have even proffered a few technical photographic suggestions, and provided some insights about composition. It seems now there is little else to do, and yet there is an abundance of imagery still worth viewing. So, I am going to say less, if anything at all, and just post the images for you to enjoy. In leaving the verbiage aside, I will remind you, this was all shot on transparency film with medium format cameras, and WELL BEFORE digital, and Adobe, arrived. What you see, is what was there, and quite an amzing world it is. Enjoy!
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2019, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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Wednesday, December 4, 2019

Weekly Post: STONED IMMACULATE: A Trip in the Desert by Robert Glenn Ketchum

STONED IMMACULATE:  A Trip in the Desert
by Robert Glenn Ketchum


As a young photographer, two places I “discovered” by chance greatly influenced both my photographic vision and my personal relationship with the greater planet. A previous blog, LIMEKILN, is the story of the first location. THIS is the second location which I discovered because my car broke down. As Jim Morrison/The Doors wrote, “Out here we is Stoned Immaculate!"



Wednesday, December 4, 2019
Ochre Orbs Floating on a Field of Electric Violet"
circa 1985 -1995

Stoned Immaculate, #160:
Immaculate, #160:  from the portfolio, STONED IMMACULATE

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2019, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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Weekly Post, ARCTIC: At the Cutting Edge of Climate Change (#101-present)

ARCTIC:  At the Cutting Edge of Climate Change
by Robert Glenn Ketchum



In 1993, I began traveling to the Arctic. I have been across The Northwest Passage by yacht; to the North Pole twice; to little-visited Russian islands; and aboard research vessels in Greenland, Labrador, Newfoundland, and Baffin Island, taking the opportunity to visit Iqualuit, the capital of Nunavut, the recently created Inuit nation and territories.





Wednesday, December 4, 2019

ARCTIC:  At the Cutting Edge of Climate Change, #173:
ARCTIC, #173:   Axel Heiberg is a huge island with a very convoluted coast, over which we are gradually flying north, and east. As you have seen in the last two posts, our initial encounter was a landscape of rolling mesas, but as we fly farther inland, the valleys grow deeper and the mountains grow higher. What I can view through the portal window of this mail plane is sometimes obscured by clouds, but then it surprises me with a “reveal.” In the image above, the reveal offers up an interesting perspective of how large Axel Heiberg is. The low clouds have briefly parted to uncover foothills carved by deep valleys. In the mid-ground, those foothills have risen into rounded mountains. On the distant horizon, however, VERY substantial summits extend completely above the clouds. These summits are part of the sizable range of peaks that form the north-south spine of this island, and over which our flight will eventually take us.

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2019, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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Tuesday, December 3, 2019

Weekly Post, NO PEBBLE MINE: Pictures from Ground Zero (#301+) by Robert Glenn Ketchum

NO PEBBLE MINE Pictures from Ground Zero
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

 
Since 1998, I have been working to protect the spectacular resources of southwest Alaska and the fishery of Bristol Bay. Two Aperture books, a national traveling exhibition, a massive coalition of concerned users, and a lot of personal lobbying, had it looking like we were almost there. Then Donald Trump took office claiming he would always put America, and American jobs first. SO WHY destroy a BILLION-dollar-a-year, RENEWABLE salmon fishery and over 100,000 jobs for a group of international mineral speculators that will leave us with a Superfund site to clean up, and NO fishery left edible? And yet, he did,..so please, keep saying NO TO THE PEBBLE MINE!
~Robert Glenn Ketchum






Tuesday, December 3, 2019 

NO PEBBLE MINE #377, Pictures from Ground Zero
NO PEBBLE MINE #377:  While my assistant, Rhett Turner and I, wait to hear from the National Park Service reservation system about getting lodging in Katmai National Park for one last late fall viewing of the bears, we bide our time in King Salmon-Naknek, while serious daily weather streams over us. Every day grows colder, and it rains A LOT. We try to get out in between squalls to make a few pictures, because the tundra is aflame with fall color, but there is a considerable amount of time that we just sit our car and listen to the pounding rain. When it does let up, and we can work, we are well rewarded with displays such as you see above. The terrain around the villages is very diverse, and depending on where we drive, there are many varied ecosystems we can visit, so it is never boring, just cold, and REALLY wet. In the late afternoon, we warm up at the home of a friend in Naknek, and I must confess, that involves some fair amount of drinking. It also places us close to the coastal bluffs, and an amazing view of Bristol Bay, which we try to take in each night, regardless of the weather. There is ALWAYS something dramatic going on, as can see in post #376.

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2019, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd @NRDC @OrvisFlyFishing #NoPebbleMine #LittleBearProd

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Orvis Supports No Pebble Mine

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