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Friday, September 20, 2019

The Daze of My Life: Robert Glenn Ketchum, An Autobiography

The Daze of My Life:  Robert Glenn Ketchum, An Autobiography


Biographies are studies of someone's life based on cumulative research. Good ones may reveal something, but probably barely scratch the surface of what actually went on. The internet is allowing me to do something VERY different. 
~Robert Glenn Ketchum




Friday, September 20, 2019

The Daze of My Life:  Robert Glenn Ketchum, An Autobiography #166: Daze, #166: The Chattahoochee National Recreation Area (CNRA) includes both a national forest, and the Chattahoochee River, which flows through the middle of Atlanta. Tom Cousins, one of Atlanta’s great patrons and developers (see last post), has created the huge complex, Wildwood Office Parks, adjacent the river, and he has commissioned me to photograph the CNRA. Although it is only the mid-80’s, Cousins’ Wildwood development is considered “environmentally sensitive,” because of sight planning that made many structures less visible in the landscape, and as I would learn, Cousins also provided 1,700 acres of land now incorporated into the CNRA. I knew he offered me this commission because he was especially fond of some of my images in the series, “Order From Chaos,” so I face the challenge of working in the forest without hesitation, but I know I also need to address the river. Much of the year, Atlanta is VERY hot and Humid, and as you can see in the previous post, the cold river water and the hot, moist air, often create morning fogs along the river’s edge, so I begin to study the visuals of that. The forest also has a stunning fall and spring display, and I look forward to those seasons, as I know there will be a lot of opportunity to shoot.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2019 
@RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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Late Fall High in the Sawtooths by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Late Fall High in the Sawtooths
by Robert Glenn Ketchum



My partner, Vicki Golden, and I, have come to love backpacking in late fall. Although we risk getting snowed upon, most of the bugs, and virtually all of the people are gone. This is our last camping trip together, and the last time I ever camped in the Sawtooths. This is a short blog to say goodbye to both.  
~Robert Glenn Ketchum




Friday, September 20, 2019

Sawtooths, #2:
Sawtooths #2:  My partner and longtime backpacking companion, Vicki Golden, and I have decided to due one last, short, late fall camping trip into the Sawtooth Mountains of Idaho. We have been ferried across Redfish Lake to the Redfish Creek trailhead, and have spent the morning, walking beside the stream. Now the real work begins as we must ascend a steep set of switchbacks to reach the Baron Lakes Basin where we expect to camp. The trail is a tough one and climbs some serious vertical, but at least the overcast sky, keeps our day relatively cool, and this late in the fall, the insect population is minimal. The hike is tasking, but the view improves with every step, and we are in no hurry, so we take our time, and plod ahead slowly but surely. There are some nice places to stop along the trail to snack and drink water, so we enjoy them, and it is late in the afternoon before we reach the lakes. The largest of the lakes is in a dramatic basin, surrounded by Sawtooth spires and summits in every direction. The lake also has large meadows and lots of trees, many of which are wind-sculpted limber pine, decorating granite ledges. After our years of previous backpacks, we know a great thing when we see it, and this is the place. There is no problem finding a scenically situated tent site, and by the time we establish camp, the late light of evening has crept under the cloud cover, and is radiantly illuminating our basin, which is drenched with fall color. At the moment, it is also dead-calm, and the lake is a PERFECT mirror, so I am having some fun with that.

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2019, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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Thursday, September 19, 2019

Welcome to Hotel California: Some Pictures from My Backyard by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Welcome To Hotel California:  Some Pictures From My Backyard
by Robert Glenn Ketchum



I was born, and grew up in Los Angeles. As my professional career developed, I traveled around the world working on various commissions, but seldom had opportunities to work in California. Nonetheless, I always came back “home,” and when there, I occasionally took pictures. For ten years I also taught a photography workshop on the Mendocino coast that provided some great visual moments as well. There is no “project” unifying these images, they are just my way of showing, “You can check out any time you like, but you can never leave.”   ~Robert Glenn Ketchum




Thursday, September 19, 2019

Hotel California, #4:
California #4:  If you follow my blogs, you will know I spent 35yrs. in Suzhou, China, collaboration with the premier embroiderers in the world, through the UCLA-China Exchange Program, which I entered in 1985. The last post of the blooming cherry tree was one of the images they chose to embroider, and it is ASTOUNDING, so I thought you might like to see it. In the process of being stitched, EVERYTHING you see here is a stitch. In fact, in this one shot, there are more than 10 different stitch styles visible. If you would like to know more about the embroideries created, go here.

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2019, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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Weekly Post, SUNDANCE: Artist-In-Residence by Robert Glenn Ketchum

SUNDANCE:  Artist In Residence
by Robert Glenn Ketchum



From 1987-1989, Robert Redford invited me to become the first visual Artist-In-Residence at his newly established Sundance Institute, part of the community he was building around his recently purchased ski resort in Utah. The residency provided me with subject matter that produced some of the most significant images of my career, but importantly, it also afforded me my first aerial work, a platform that would become increasingly important throughout my life. A limited amount of these images were ever published, and NONE of the aerials ever were. The best will now appear, please enjoy!  ~Robert Glenn Ketchum





Thursday, September 19, 2019

SUNDANCE: Artist In Residence, #62:
Sundance #62:  Thickets of trees that seem similar in the rather uniform green of summer, suddenly distinguish themselves from one another as the colors of fall, flood into their leaves. There are many places around the Wasatch Mountains where trees are growing in stands, and they are usually similarly colored in the turn of fall, all yellow, all red. But, overgrown thickets and river banks are a complex intermix of tree varieties, and shrubbery, so when all of these flame off with their individual colors, woven together through entwined branches, it is a psychedelic display to say the least. When all of this starts floating gently on a light breeze, the only appropriate description I can think of is, “trippy.” On a drizzly, but bright day, like above, Sundance and its environs are one of the greatest shows on Earth.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2019, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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Wednesday, September 18, 2019

Weekly Post: STONED IMMACULATE: A Trip in the Desert by Robert Glenn Ketchum

STONED IMMACULATE:  A Trip in the Desert
by Robert Glenn Ketchum


As a young photographer, two places I “discovered” by chance greatly influenced both my photographic vision and my personal relationship with the greater planet. A previous blog, LIMEKILN, is the story of the first location. THIS is the second location which I discovered because my car broke down. As Jim Morrison/The Doors wrote, “Out here we is Stoned Immaculate!"



Wednesday, September 18, 2019
“Intruding Extrusion"
circa 1985 -1995

Stoned Immaculate, #149:
Immaculate, #149:  from the portfolio, STONED IMMACULATE

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2019, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism Online:
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Weekly Post, ARCTIC: At the Cutting Edge of Climate Change

ARCTIC:  At the Cutting Edge of Climate Change
by Robert Glenn Ketchum



In 1993, I began traveling to the Arctic. I have been across The Northwest Passage by yacht; to the North Pole twice; to little-visited Russian islands; and aboard research vessels in Greenland, Labrador, Newfoundland, and Baffin Island, taking the opportunity to visit Iqualuit, the capital of Nunavut, the recently created Inuit nation and territories.





Wednesday, September 18, 2019

ARCTIC:  At the Cutting Edge of Climate Change, #162:
ARCTIC, #162:   Bill Simon and all the guests aboard “Itasca” are now in the mail-cargo plane, starting our long day of flying to Eureka base camp on Ellesmere Island. Leaving the airport at Pond Inlet, we follow the shoreline of Baffin Island out to Baffin Bay, where we make a left turn, crossing over to Bylot Island, and flying above its coastal plain. We have not seen this side of Bylot before, and we are amazed by the rugged, vertical walls. About halfway around the island, we cross above a vast coastal plain that is lichen and tundra covered, pocked with pothole lakes, and laced by rivers and streams everywhere. The plain also has a very distinct red tone, which to me, suggests the surface of Mars. The pilots tell us that 10yrs. ago, this was all beneath the ice of two of the largest glaciers to come down from the icefield atop Angilaaq Mountain. That ice is now many miles from us. Apparently there is also a big, new lake out there, somewhere in this terrain. We are flying away from that view, however, as our flight now begins to cross Lancaster Sound, headed for the coast of Devon Island. Until now, we have been flying fairly low, but as we cross the sound, we begin to climb considerably in altitude.

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2019, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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Tuesday, September 17, 2019

Weekly Post, NO PEBBLE MINE: Pictures from Ground Zero by Robert Glenn Ketchum

NO PEBBLE MINE Pictures from Ground Zero
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

 
Since 1998, I have been working to protect the spectacular resources of southwest Alaska and the fishery of Bristol Bay. Two Aperture books, a national traveling exhibition, a massive coalition of concerned users, and a lot of personal lobbying, had it looking like we were almost there. Then Donald Trump took office claiming he would always put America, and American jobs first. SO WHY destroy a BILLION-dollar-a-year, RENEWABLE salmon fishery and over 100,000 jobs for a group of international mineral speculators that will leave us with a Superfund site to clean up, and NO fishery left edible? And yet, he did,..so please, keep saying NO TO THE PEBBLE MINE!
~Robert Glenn Ketchum






Tuesday, September 17, 2019 

NO PEBBLE MINE #366, Pictures from Ground Zero
NO PEBBLE MINE #366:  The entire Kanektok River drainage seems to meander just like the river. As it retreats to its headwaters, it snakes around numerous mountains and ranges with big sweeping curves of the valley floor. Again, I encourage you to use the Google link provided. Be sure to + magnify the river to see its many meanders, then you can back out a little and see the way the river wanders through various valley floors, as it wends its way over 75-miles, back into the Ahklun Mountains and to Kagati and Pegati Lakes. There is little forest here, this is mostly a tundra environment, and summits are very spare of vegetation. What is clear to me, however, is that this is a massive catch-basin for rain and snow coming out of the Bering Sea, and that is what keeps this river and the myriad tributaries feeding into, thriving.

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2019, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd @NRDC @OrvisFlyFishing #NoPebbleMine #LittleBearProd

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Weekly Post: THE TONGASS: Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees by Robert Glenn Ketchum

THE TONGASS:  Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees
by Robert Glenn Ketchum
In 1985, I began a 2-year commission to explore the Tongass rainforest, the largest forest in the United States Forest Service (USFS) system AND the largest temperate rainforest in the world. It was a unique, old-growth environment under siege from industrial logging. The resulting investigative book I published helped to pass the Tongass Timber Reform Bill, protect 1,000,000 acres of old-growth, and create 11 new wilderness areas. This is the story of how that was achieved.




Tuesday, September 17, 2019

THE TONGASS:  Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees, #160:
THE TONGASS, #160:   Halfway through our day, hiking and canoe traversing Admiralty Island, we still have a paddle and a portage left to go, so we are refueling with a lunch. We are on the swampy shore of Hasselborg Lake, and the gods are being kind to us because it is not raining, the bugs are at a minimum, and the food is plentiful. There is no solid ground on which to stand, sit, or set up a food table, so our guide, Jeff Sloss, has flipped a canoe over as a table substitute, and we are all just wandering around through the reeds, ankle deep in the lake, testing the waterproofness of our Goodyear Xtra-tuffs (LOL!) After lunch, we spend serious time crossing the lake because it is so wide, and then we must slog the 1.7-mile portage to Lake Guerin - that is 2.4 miles round trip x 3, after which we are completely fried. You will have a better sense of that when you see next week’s post. Please tune in. AND, PLEASE HELP SAVE THE TONGASS, the Trump Administration is trying to undermine logging restrictions, deny roadless protections, and open more mining leases.

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2019, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: @LittleBearProd
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Monday, September 16, 2019

Weekly Post, High and Wild: Three Years of Wandering in the Wind Rivers

High and Wild: Three Years of Wandering in the Wind Rivers
by Robert Glenn Ketchum



After receiving my MFA from CalArts, I was invited by Bill Lund, Sharon Disney’s husband, to come stay at the families' Diamond-D Ranch in Dubois, Wyoming. Bill thought I might like to photograph in the nearby Wind River Mountains, which I did, backpacking through them extensively over the next three summers. Welcome to a world of big granite walls and huge alpine lakes!
~Robert Glenn Ketchum




Monday, September 16, 2019

High and Wild:  Three Years of Wandering in the Wind Rivers, #108: Wind River, #108: By the time Vicki Golden and I arrive at the outlet of Big Sandy Lake it is mid-afternoon, and it takes a while longer to navigate around the shoreline to a big meadow. Nearby, the trail climbs Jackass Pass into the Cirque of the Towers, which we hope to day-hike tomorrow, so we find a sheltered spot in a cluster of trees, and set up camp. By the time we are finished setting up, the big meadow has developed the golden glow of late light, and my black lab, Belle Star, is running wildly around in the flowers, and jumping into the creek to chase trout skittering through the pools. It is warm and beautiful, so we sit in the sun watching Belle frolic. There are other campers here, but they are around the meadow, on the other side of the lake, so they are undisturbed by the traffic of climbers walking through to get to the Cirque. I do note, however, that Belle is chasing fish, so I grab my pole to see if dinner can be enhanced with fresh trout. It is a wonderful twilight of fishing, and I catch two, large enough to have some for Belle, as well (it is her FAVORITE thing!). After dinner, the clear day, gives way to a cold, clear night, and thankfully the full-blown mosquito population has not yet arisen, so we sit for awhile under a stunning star-filled sky, both glad we are once again high and wild in the Wind Rivers,..and we are about to get a whole lot higher.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2019, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd


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Weekly Post: The Higher You Get, The Higher You Get by Robert Glenn Ketchum

by Robert Glenn Ketchum


Growing up my parents had a home near Sun Valley, Idaho. It was there that I learned to ski. Over many years I befriended members of the Decker Flats Climbing and Frisbee Club, with whom I had both life, and art-forming outdoor experiences. I had my camera, and these are my adventures. Enjoy!!  
~Robert Glenn Ketchum



Monday, September 162019

The Higher You Get, The Higher You Get - Sun Valley and the DFC&FC, #176: DFCFC, #176:  After a good bit of time spent snacking and observing in a high valley beneath the Old Hyndman summit, the cold of the evening shade stirs me to head back for our snow cave encampment, well below my afternoon perch. Skiing warms me up, as does returning to direct sunlight, and getting out of the freezing shadows beneath the big walls. I am finally at the point where I can see my comrades and our camp bench, and it appears we are all headed home from the various locations we have been exploring. When I look back at where I have been, I am once again overwhelmed by the drama of the Old Hyndman-Cobb Peak basin and connecting ridge headwalls. Some of the last light of day is being fractured across the rock and ice of that ridge, just before it pushes up into Cobb Peak, out of frame to the right. Many years from now, Gordon Williams, will go on to mountaineer in the Himalayas, but this day, this place,..it seems Himalayan to me.

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2019, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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Orvis Supports No Pebble Mine

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